STUDENTS
Parents

Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium2019-01-11T13:56:40+00:00

Dear parent/carer,

Re: pupil premium and free school meals

If your child is eligible for ‘free school meals’ and you register them for this, we’ll receive extra funding called ‘pupil premium’. We use this extra money to improve the educational provision and resources at the school.

What is pupil premium funding?

Pupil premium funding from the government is given to schools to help pupils reach their full potential, regardless of their background or financial situation. It’s provided for pupils who:

  • Are registered for free school meals
  • Have been registered for free school meals at any point in the past 6 years
  • Are, or have been, in care
  • Have parents in the armed forces

At Crown Hills Community College, we get an extra £935 for every eligible pupil who is registered for free school meals. This extra money could make a real difference to the quality of education we offer.

For example, we’ve previously used pupil premium funding for:

  • Educational provision/resources/trips
  • Academic interventions
  • Wellbeing and self-esteem building interventions

 

Is my child eligible for free school meals?

Your child might be eligible if you receive:

  • Income Support
  • Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA) or Employment and Support Allowance
  • Support under part VI of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999
  • The guaranteed element of Pension Credit
  • Child Tax Credit (provided you’re not also entitled to Working Tax Credit and have an annual gross income of no more than £16,190)
  • Working Tax Credit run-on
  • Universal Credit, provided you have an annual net earned income not exceeding £7,400 (£616.67 per month)

 

Does my child have to eat the free school meals?

No.   Pupils who are registered for free school meals don’t have to eat them. If you’re eligible but you want your child to have packed lunches you should still register because the school will receive the funding which can support your child in other ways.

How do I Apply?

You only need to apply once.

Free School Meal Applications forms can be obtained from the School Office.   Once completed they should be posted to Free School Meals Service, 3rd Floor City Hall,  115 Charles Street, Leicester,  LE1 1FZ   or deliver by hand to Customer Services, Ground Floor, 91 Granby Street,  Leicester.

Alternatively applications can be completed over the phone on 0116 4541009 (option3) or online at www.leicester.gov.uk

More information

For more information about pupil premium go to our website, which contains details of how the pupil premium has been spent in the past academic year and how it will be spent this year.

If you have any questions or specific concerns, please contact the school.

Crown Hills Community College – Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium funding was introduced by the Government in April 2011. This funding is allocated to the school to support children from low-income families that are eligible for Free School Meals (FSM) or have been eligible at any point in the last 6 years. Pupil Premium funding is also given for pupils in care who have been looked after continuously (LAC) for more than 6 months and support children with parents serving in the regular British Armed Forces.

How much is the Pupil Premium?

In 2016/17 the allocation was £386,275 including LAC Pupils.

In 2017/18 the allocation was £327,980 including LAC pupils.

For the 2018/19 academic year, the premium will be worth £935 per student, which is provisionally set to £329,185 including LAC pupils.

How many students at Crown Hills Community College are eligible for the Pupil Premium?

Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11 KS3 KS4 Whole school
Number PP students 69 75 68 70 56 212 126 338
Total number of students 296 296 293 257 259 885 516 1401
%PP 23.3 25.3 23.2 27.2 21.6 24.4 24.4 24.1

How does Crown Hills Community College spend Pupil Premium funding?

The Department for Education states that Pupil Premium funding, which is in addition to the main school budget, is the best way to address the current underlying inequalities between children eligible for FSM and their wealthier peers, by ensuring that funding to tackle disadvantage reaches those pupils who need it most.

Schools are free to spend the Pupil Premium as they see fit. However, the Government have stated that schools will be held accountable for how they have used the additional funding to support pupils from low income families through the outcomes they achieve.

At Crown Hills Community College, we rigorously ensure that the Pupil Premium funding is used to ‘transform lives’ and allows every student to achieve. The overriding aim for the Pupil Premium spend is to raise the achievement of our disadvantaged students, across the curriculum, closing the gaps between the achievement of our disadvantaged students and others, as well as the national achievement standards of all students.

To ensure the Pupil Premium funding has the highest impact for our most disadvantaged students we have set the following nine objectives for this academic year. These key strategic objectives are part of the whole college development plan, with the actions and spending plans, which constitute each one for this year. Our 2018 GCSE results showed that the attainment gap between the percentage of disadvantaged students that achieved a grade 5 or above in both English and Maths and other students was 2.5%. This is a closing gap relative to 2017, where the within school gap was 18%. We aim to continue to close this gap further, with a whole school focus on closing the boy/girl gap.

Key desired outcomes of Pupil Premium strategy

Parental Engagement Increased number of parents attending parents evening and catch-up consultation meetings.
Independent Learning Provide opportunity for students to extend learning during out of school hours, by incorporating methods to support independent learning.
Attendance Improve attendance, unauthorised absences with PP students, in particular year 11 boys.
Enrichment/Building Cultural Capital Ensure all PP students participate in at least 1 new co-curricular session and attend at least 1 trip per year.
Commitment/Aspiration Ensure all PP students receive careers guidance which assists/directs with future aspirations
Health, social, emotional, physical Issues regarding social, emotional, health and wellbeing are removed to allow all PP students to achieve successfully without barriers
Academic Achievement T&L in lessons allows all PP students to be prioritised, ensuring progress is made comparatively to others at CH and nationally. Intervention strategies in place, measured outcomes for success. Establish monitoring systems so that all PP intervention is tracked and therefore measured for impact (SIMS spreadsheet)
Behaviour Reduced level of on-call % rates with PP students
Finance A clear connection between the PP budget and the impact on students is made.

Barriers to educational achievement faced by students at Crown Hills Community College

Almost a third of the students at Crown Hills are disadvantaged and eligible for the Pupil Premium. As such, it is difficult to report on barriers to learning that apply to all such students. However, there are common threads that apply to many disadvantaged students at Crown Hills:

Physical barriers

  • Attendance – Poor attendance (particularly PP Boys) and persistent unauthorised absences of some disadvantaged students.
  • Behaviour – High level of on-call rates with PP students compared to others

Academic barriers

  • Low Reading Ages on entry – Disadvantaged students, as well as other students in school, have low levels of reading on entry, including students with high EAL needs.
  • Independent Learning – Some PP students and others, struggle to time manage and to learn effectively and independently at home.
  • Parental Engagement – Some parents of PP students are hard to reach (i.e. attendance at parents’ evenings). Building strong relationships with these families can be more complex, as many languages spoken as a first language at home = poor communication with parents and parental support impeded.

Emotional, social and cultural barriers

  • Commitment/Aspiration – Students have extremely high aspirational goals and visions for the future, but are not fully able to understand how or what they need to do in order to achieve this, including working independently at home and gaining high attainment levels in subjects.
  • Health, social, emotional, physical – High proportion of PP students are from extremely deprived backgrounds. They have not had regular eye screening, have poor eating and sleeping habits, and lack the energy and motivation needed in class.
  • Enrichment/Building Cultural Capital – Many PP students are unable to participate in extra-curricular activities to enhance confidence and cultural capital.

With these barriers in mind, the spending plans and actions plan activities have been formed as seen in the overview in the attached Crown Hills Community College Pupil Premium Strategy 2018-19, below.

Impact – Review 2018

Gaps

Our 2018 GCSE results showed that the attainment gap between the percentage of disadvantaged students that achieved a grade 5 or above in both English and Maths (known as the ‘Basics’ measure) and other students was 2.5%. This is a closing gap relative to 2017, where the within school gap was 18%.

Outcomes of disadvantaged students on new performance measures

Results for disadvantaged students in Summer 2018 (GCSE)
Pupils eligible for PP at CHCC Pupils not eligible for PP PP NA 2018

(figures TBC)

% achieving 4+ (standard pass) GCSE 58.5% 60.4%
% achieving 5+ (Strong pass) GCSE 39% 41.5%
% achieving 9-7 GCSE 6.1% 11%
% achieving EBACC (strong Pass) GCSE 8.5% 9.1%
Progress 8 score average (Ability) All – 0.11 (Gap 0.25)

High – 0.04 (Gap -0.08)

Mid – 0.13 (Gap -0.25)

Low – 0.18 (Gap -0.56)

All – 0.36

High – 0.12

Mid – 0.38

Low – 0.74

Progress 8 score average (Gender) Girls 0.87 (Gap -0.02)

Boys -0.53 (Gap -0.53)

Girls 0.89

Boys 0

Attainment 8 score average All  43.42 (Gap -0.91)

Girls 50.26 (Gap +2.80)

Boys 37.22 (Gap -4.84)

All  44.33

Girls 47.46

Boys 42.06

Attendance Figures (>96%) All – 15%

Girls – 13%

Boys-  16%

All – 26%

Girls – 26%

Boys – 28%

Progress 8 Attendance (>96%) All – 0.79

Girls – 1.12

Boys – 0.60

All – 0.88

Girls – 1.39

Boys – 0.6

Academic Achievement

The academic progress and attainment of all students is tracked through Years 7 -11. This enables us to arrange targeted intervention and to measure the progress of pupil premium students.  Comparisons can then be made against the progress of their non-pupil premium peers.

The following provision was made available in 2017/18 to ensure that all students attained their full academic potential thereby bridging the gap between pupil premium and non-pupil premium students.

  • One to One Coaching – in Maths, English and Science provides focused, individual sessions for identified students. The tutors are experienced teachers who work at Crown Hills for 2 days per week in Maths, 2 days per week in Science and 3 days per week in English providing personalized intervention lessons for each student.
  • Academic Coaching – in Maths, English and Science provides similar support as One to One but the tutors work with small groups of students, predominantly in KS4 as a preparation for GCSE examinations.
  • Holiday revision classes – are provided by class teachers and are available to all students who wish to attend. They are focused on exam preparation and course work catch up at key points in the academic year.
  • The Achievement Team – works across the whole school, liaising with Heads of Faculty and Heads of Years, to increase students’ confidence in examination techniques and improved revision methodology, by teaching memory aids and organising brain training workshops.
  • The Health and Wellbeing Team – promote healthy lifestyles and healthy eating to ensure that the students are physically and mentally prepared for school life.
  • Library Study Time – The school library is open at break time, lunch time and after school to ensure that students have a quiet place for homework or lesson preparation.
  • Year 6/7 Induction carried out by the Head of Year 7 in our feeder primary schools ensures that all students moving up to Crown Hills are familiar with our routines, have met their form tutors and feel confident about the change. Identified vulnerable students experience additional transition days with support from the Learning Mentors.
  • The Aim Higher – tutor identifies Gifted and Talented Students, raises aspirations, arranges university visits and monitors achievement of our most able students.
  • Raising Aspiration – two members of staff, the Challenge Co-ordinator and the Widening Participation Co-ordinator arrange university visits, guest speakers, masterclasses, lectures and other experiences. They monitor achievement of the more able students.

Impact of above

2016/17 – the Basics measure of a grade 5 or above in English and Maths for Pupil Premium students was 19% and non-Pupil Premium was 37% therefore, there was a gap of 18% within the school. Against the National benchmark of 49% for other pupils the gap was 30%.  The Progress 8 Score of 2016/17 for Pupil Premium students was -0.01 and for the whole school was 0. This means the progress made by pupil premium students was average and therefore as expected.

2017/18 – the Basics measure of a grade 5 or above in English and Maths for Pupil Premium students was 39% and non-Pupil Premium was 41.5% therefore, there was a gap of 2.5% within the school. The Progress 8 Score of 2017/18 for Pupil Premium students was 0.07 and for the whole school was 0.25.  This means the progress made by pupil premium students is average, and above average for the whole school.

In English 59.8% of Pupil Premium students achieved a grade 5 or above, with non-Pupil Premium students achieving 55.5%.

In Maths 43.9% of Pupil Premium students achieved a grade 5 or above, with non-Pupil Premium students achieving 47%.

In Combined Science 29.2% of Pupil Premium students achieved a grade 5 or above, with non-Pupil Premium students achieving 32.3%.

The gaps in attainment are therefore the same across the core subjects, however the gap has reduced significantly, seeing the gap close from 18% to 2.5% in one year.

Student Engagement and Attendance

A network of key workers supports all students, particularly the most vulnerable, to ensure they feel safe and happy in school and are able to fulfil their full potential.

  • Breakfast Club – All pupils have the opportunity of a free breakfast before the start of lessons. This increases readiness for learning and has a positive effect on the behaviour and ethos of students.
  • Learning Mentors – Mentors work towards removing the barriers to learning that some students encounter. They work with students identified by Key Stage Leaders and provide emotional support as well as arranging involvement of other key workers as required. Behaviour and attendance improves as a result of regular mentoring sessions.
  • Nurture Group supports children who lack the skills to integrate socially with their peers. Through regular sessions of group work they learn new social skills and invite parents and other adults to join them in the Nurture base where they confidently show their work and serve refreshments.
  • Counsellor from Knighton Counselling provides one to one, confidential counselling sessions for students with complex, personal issues that make progress and learning in school difficult to achieve. Attendance and Welfare Officers support students and families by closely monitoring attendance. Regular contact by text and email ensures parents are aware of any issues as they arise.
  • Behaviour Support Team work with our most challenging students, enforcing sanctions when necessary but also providing encouragement and support to keep them on track academically.
  • Alternative Academic Provision is arranged on the very rare occasions when all the above interventions fail and arranging an alternative academic provision off site is deemed the best option.

Impact of above

In 2016/17 the attendance of pupil premium students was 93.5% and whole school was 94.9%, with a gap of 1.4%.

In 2017/18 the attendance of pupil premium students was 93.26% and attendance for whole school was 94.5%, so the gap reduced to 1.2%.

Enrichment

Academic Trips Subsidy ensures that all students from a disadvantaged background can attend trips and visits free of charge where the college feels it is appropriate.

Impact of above

Access for pupil premium students to out of school activities and trips ensures they have the opportunities to develop social skills and confidence, to take part in team building activities and to enjoy academic achievements by celebrating with their peers. This is recorded centrally.

Our Pupil Premium allocation for 2018/19 and how we plan to spend it is attached.  We will continue to monitor progress and review our practices to ensure that any barriers to success for all of our students are removed.

Review

An analysis of how the 2017/18 Pupil Premium was spent and an impact statement is attached below. Extensive research on soft and hard data, including a student survey completed by over 300 PP students has driven the objectives for the 18/19 strategy. The Pupil Premium strategy will be quality assured and challenged by the named Pupil Premium linked Governor.

Dear parent/carer,

Re: pupil premium and free school meals

If your child is eligible for ‘free school meals’ and you register them for this, we’ll receive extra funding called ‘pupil premium’. We use this extra money to improve the educational provision and resources at the school.

What is pupil premium funding?

Pupil premium funding from the government is given to schools to help pupils reach their full potential, regardless of their background or financial situation. It’s provided for pupils who:

  • Are registered for free school meals
  • Have been registered for free school meals at any point in the past 6 years
  • Are, or have been, in care
  • Have parents in the armed forces

At Crown Hills Community College, we get an extra £935 for every eligible pupil who is registered for free school meals. This extra money could make a real difference to the quality of education we offer.

For example, we’ve previously used pupil premium funding for:

  • Educational provision/resources/trips
  • Academic interventions
  • Wellbeing and self-esteem building interventions

Is my child eligible for free school meals?

Your child might be eligible if you access:

  • Income Support
  • Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance or Employment and Support Allowance
  • Support under part VI of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999
  • The guaranteed element of Pension Credit
  • Child Tax Credit (provided you’re not also entitled to Working Tax Credit and have an annual gross income of no more than £16,190)
  • Working Tax Credit run-on
  • Universal Credit, provided you have an annual net earned income not exceeding £7,400 (£616.67 per month)

Does my child have to eat the free school meals?

No. Pupils who are registered for free school meals don’t have to eat them. If you’re eligible but you want your child to have packed lunches you should still register because the school will receive the funding which can support your child in other ways.

How do I register?

You only need to register once at the school.

To register, please:

[Insert information about your school’s process for registering for free school meals here. You should contact your local authority to find out if there are locally determined procedures]

More information

For more information about pupil premium go to our website, which contains details of how the pupil premium has been spent in the past academic year and how it will be spent this year.

If you have any questions or specific concerns, please contact the school.

Best wishes,

Sally-Ann Duis

Associate Assistant Principal

sduis@crownhills.leicester.sch.uk

Crown Hills Community College – Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium funding was introduced by the Government in April 2011. This funding is allocated to the school to support children from low-income families that are eligible for Free School Meals (FSM) or have been eligible at any point in the last 6 years. Pupil Premium funding is also given for pupils in care who have been looked after continuously (LAC) for more than 6 months and support children with parents serving in the regular British Armed Forces.

How much is the Pupil Premium?

In 2016/17 the allocation was £386,275 including LAC Pupils.

In 2017/18 the allocation was £327,980 including LAC pupils.

For the 2018/19 academic year, the premium will be worth £935 per student, which is provisionally set to £329,185 including LAC pupils.

How many students at Crown Hills Community College are eligible for the Pupil Premium?

Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11 KS3 KS4 Whole school
Number PP students 69 75 68 70 56 212 126 338
Total number of students 296 296 293 257 259 885 516 1401
%PP 23.3 25.3 23.2 27.2 21.6 24.4 24.4 24.1

How does Crown Hills Community College spend Pupil Premium funding?

The Department for Education states that Pupil Premium funding, which is in addition to the main school budget, is the best way to address the current underlying inequalities between children eligible for FSM and their wealthier peers, by ensuring that funding to tackle disadvantage reaches those pupils who need it most.

Schools are free to spend the Pupil Premium as they see fit. However, the Government have stated that schools will be held accountable for how they have used the additional funding to support pupils from low income families through the outcomes they achieve.

At Crown Hills Community College, we rigorously ensure that the Pupil Premium funding is used to ‘transform lives’ and allows every student to achieve. The overriding aim for the Pupil Premium spend is to raise the achievement of our disadvantaged students, across the curriculum, closing the gaps between the achievement of our disadvantaged students and others, as well as the national achievement standards of all students.

To ensure the Pupil Premium funding has the highest impact for our most disadvantaged students we have set the following nine objectives for this academic year. These key strategic objectives are part of the whole college development plan, with the actions and spending plans, which constitute each one for this year. Our 2018 GCSE results showed that the attainment gap between the percentage of disadvantaged students that achieved a grade 5 or above in both English and Maths and other students was 2.5%. This is a closing gap relative to 2017, where the within school gap was 18%. We aim to continue to close this gap further, with a whole school focus on closing the boy/girl gap.

Key desired outcomes of Pupil Premium strategy

Parental Engagement Increased number of parents attending parents evening and catch-up consultation meetings.
Independent Learning Provide opportunity for students to extend learning during out of school hours, by incorporating methods to support independent learning.
Attendance Improve attendance, unauthorised absences with PP students, in particular year 11 boys.
Enrichment/Building Cultural Capital Ensure all PP students participate in at least 1 new co-curricular session and attend at least 1 trip per year.
Commitment/Aspiration Ensure all PP students receive careers guidance which assists/directs with future aspirations
Health, social, emotional, physical Issues regarding social, emotional, health and wellbeing are removed to allow all PP students to achieve successfully without barriers
Academic Achievement T&L in lessons allows all PP students to be prioritised, ensuring progress is made comparatively to others at CH and nationally. Intervention strategies in place, measured outcomes for success. Establish monitoring systems so that all PP intervention is tracked and therefore measured for impact (SIMS spreadsheet)
Behaviour Reduced level of on-call % rates with PP students
Finance A clear connection between the PP budget and the impact on students is made.

Barriers to educational achievement faced by students at Crown Hills Community College

Almost a third of the students at Crown Hills are disadvantaged and eligible for the Pupil Premium. As such, it is difficult to report on barriers to learning that apply to all such students. However, there are common threads that apply to many disadvantaged students at Crown Hills:

Physical barriers

  • Attendance – Poor attendance (particularly PP Boys) and persistent unauthorised absences of some disadvantaged students.
  • Behaviour – High level of on-call rates with PP students compared to others

Academic barriers

  • Low Reading Ages on entry – Disadvantaged students, as well as other students in school, have low levels of reading on entry, including students with high EAL needs.
  • Independent Learning – Some PP students and others, struggle to time manage and to learn effectively and independently at home.
  • Parental Engagement – Some parents of PP students are hard to reach (i.e. attendance at parents’ evenings). Building strong relationships with these families can be more complex, as many languages spoken as a first language at home = poor communication with parents and parental support impeded.

Emotional, social and cultural barriers

  • Commitment/Aspiration – Students have extremely high aspirational goals and visions for the future, but are not fully able to understand how or what they need to do in order to achieve this, including working independently at home and gaining high attainment levels in subjects.
  • Health, social, emotional, physical – High proportion of PP students are from extremely deprived backgrounds. They have not had regular eye screening, have poor eating and sleeping habits, and lack the energy and motivation needed in class.
  • Enrichment/Building Cultural Capital – Many PP students are unable to participate in extra-curricular activities to enhance confidence and cultural capital.

With these barriers in mind, the spending plans and actions plan activities have been formed as seen in the overview in the attached Crown Hills Community College Pupil Premium Strategy 2018-19, below.

Impact – Review 2018

Gaps

Our 2018 GCSE results showed that the attainment gap between the percentage of disadvantaged students that achieved a grade 5 or above in both English and Maths (known as the ‘Basics’ measure) and other students was 2.5%. This is a closing gap relative to 2017, where the within school gap was 18%.

Outcomes of disadvantaged students on new performance measures

Results for disadvantaged students in Summer 2018 (GCSE)
Pupils eligible for PP at CHCC Pupils not eligible for PP PP NA 2018

(figures TBC)

% achieving 4+ (standard pass) GCSE 58.5% 60.4%
% achieving 5+ (Strong pass) GCSE 39% 41.5%
% achieving 9-7 GCSE 6.1% 11%
% achieving EBACC (strong Pass) GCSE 8.5% 9.1%
Progress 8 score average (Ability) All – 0.11 (Gap 0.25)

High – 0.04 (Gap -0.08)

Mid – 0.13 (Gap -0.25)

Low – 0.18 (Gap -0.56)

All – 0.36

High – 0.12

Mid – 0.38

Low – 0.74

Progress 8 score average (Gender) Girls 0.87 (Gap -0.02)

Boys -0.53 (Gap -0.53)

Girls 0.89

Boys 0

Attainment 8 score average All  43.42 (Gap -0.91)

Girls 50.26 (Gap +2.80)

Boys 37.22 (Gap -4.84)

All  44.33

Girls 47.46

Boys 42.06

Attendance Figures (>96%) All – 15%

Girls – 13%

Boys-  16%

All – 26%

Girls – 26%

Boys – 28%

Progress 8 Attendance (>96%) All – 0.79

Girls – 1.12

Boys – 0.60

All – 0.88

Girls – 1.39

Boys – 0.6

Academic Achievement

The academic progress and attainment of all students is tracked through Years 7 -11. This enables us to arrange targeted intervention and to measure the progress of pupil premium students.  Comparisons can then be made against the progress of their non-pupil premium peers.

The following provision was made available in 2017/18 to ensure that all students attained their full academic potential thereby bridging the gap between pupil premium and non-pupil premium students.

  • One to One Coaching – in Maths, English and Science provides focused, individual sessions for identified students. The tutors are experienced teachers who work at Crown Hills for 2 days per week in Maths, 2 days per week in Science and 3 days per week in English providing personalized intervention lessons for each student.
  • Academic Coaching – in Maths, English and Science provides similar support as One to One but the tutors work with small groups of students, predominantly in KS4 as a preparation for GCSE examinations.
  • Holiday revision classes – are provided by class teachers and are available to all students who wish to attend. They are focused on exam preparation and course work catch up at key points in the academic year.
  • The Achievement Team – works across the whole school, liaising with Heads of Faculty and Heads of Years, to increase students’ confidence in examination techniques and improved revision methodology, by teaching memory aids and organising brain training workshops.
  • The Health and Wellbeing Team – promote healthy lifestyles and healthy eating to ensure that the students are physically and mentally prepared for school life.
  • Library Study Time – The school library is open at break time, lunch time and after school to ensure that students have a quiet place for homework or lesson preparation.
  • Year 6/7 Induction carried out by the Head of Year 7 in our feeder primary schools ensures that all students moving up to Crown Hills are familiar with our routines, have met their form tutors and feel confident about the change. Identified vulnerable students experience additional transition days with support from the Learning Mentors.
  • The Aim Higher – tutor identifies Gifted and Talented Students, raises aspirations, arranges university visits and monitors achievement of our most able students.
  • Raising Aspiration – two members of staff, the Challenge Co-ordinator and the Widening Participation Co-ordinator arrange university visits, guest speakers, masterclasses, lectures and other experiences. They monitor achievement of the more able students.

Impact of above

2016/17 – the Basics measure of a grade 5 or above in English and Maths for Pupil Premium students was 19% and non-Pupil Premium was 37% therefore, there was a gap of 18% within the school. Against the National benchmark of 49% for other pupils the gap was 30%.  The Progress 8 Score of 2016/17 for Pupil Premium students was -0.01 and for the whole school was 0. This means the progress made by pupil premium students was average and therefore as expected.

2017/18 – the Basics measure of a grade 5 or above in English and Maths for Pupil Premium students was 39% and non-Pupil Premium was 41.5% therefore, there was a gap of 2.5% within the school. The Progress 8 Score of 2017/18 for Pupil Premium students was 0.07 and for the whole school was 0.25.  This means the progress made by pupil premium students is average, and above average for the whole school.

In English 59.8% of Pupil Premium students achieved a grade 5 or above, with non-Pupil Premium students achieving 55.5%.

In Maths 43.9% of Pupil Premium students achieved a grade 5 or above, with non-Pupil Premium students achieving 47%.

In Combined Science 29.2% of Pupil Premium students achieved a grade 5 or above, with non-Pupil Premium students achieving 32.3%.

The gaps in attainment are therefore the same across the core subjects, however the gap has reduced significantly, seeing the gap close from 18% to 2.5% in one year.

Student Engagement and Attendance

A network of key workers supports all students, particularly the most vulnerable, to ensure they feel safe and happy in school and are able to fulfil their full potential.

  • Breakfast Club – All pupils have the opportunity of a free breakfast before the start of lessons. This increases readiness for learning and has a positive effect on the behaviour and ethos of students.
  • Learning Mentors – Mentors work towards removing the barriers to learning that some students encounter. They work with students identified by Key Stage Leaders and provide emotional support as well as arranging involvement of other key workers as required. Behaviour and attendance improves as a result of regular mentoring sessions.
  • Nurture Group supports children who lack the skills to integrate socially with their peers. Through regular sessions of group work they learn new social skills and invite parents and other adults to join them in the Nurture base where they confidently show their work and serve refreshments.
  • Counsellor from Knighton Counselling provides one to one, confidential counselling sessions for students with complex, personal issues that make progress and learning in school difficult to achieve. Attendance and Welfare Officers support students and families by closely monitoring attendance. Regular contact by text and email ensures parents are aware of any issues as they arise.
  • Behaviour Support Team work with our most challenging students, enforcing sanctions when necessary but also providing encouragement and support to keep them on track academically.
  • Alternative Academic Provision is arranged on the very rare occasions when all the above interventions fail and arranging an alternative academic provision off site is deemed the best option.

Impact of above

In 2016/17 the attendance of pupil premium students was 93.5% and whole school was 94.9%, with a gap of 1.4%.

In 2017/18 the attendance of pupil premium students was 93.26% and attendance for whole school was 94.5%, so the gap reduced to 1.2%.

Enrichment

Academic Trips Subsidy ensures that all students from a disadvantaged background can attend trips and visits free of charge where the college feels it is appropriate.

Impact of above

Access for pupil premium students to out of school activities and trips ensures they have the opportunities to develop social skills and confidence, to take part in team building activities and to enjoy academic achievements by celebrating with their peers. This is recorded centrally.

Our Pupil Premium allocation for 2018/19 and how we plan to spend it is attached.  We will continue to monitor progress and review our practices to ensure that any barriers to success for all of our students are removed.

Review

An analysis of how the 2017/18 Pupil Premium was spent and an impact statement is attached below. Extensive research on soft and hard data, including a student survey completed by over 300 PP students has driven the objectives for the 18/19 strategy. The Pupil Premium strategy will be quality assured and challenged by the named Pupil Premium linked Governor.

Students
Parents