STUDENTS
Parents

Subjects

Subjects2018-12-13T12:23:45+00:00

Welcome to our subject page.

Please click on the subject you are interested on the left for further curriculum information

We have a balanced curriculum here at Crown Hills, one where your son/daughter will receive a healthy diet of subjects equipping them for college, university and the world of work. We are committed to continually improving educational outcomes and have invested heavily in Maths, English and Science in terms of increased curriculum time.

USEFUL INFORMATION

Assessment Calendar
Bridging the Gap to A level maths booklet June 2018
Foundation revision checklist
Foundation revision schedule
Higher revision checklist
Higher Revision Schedule
Maths Price List
KEY STAGE 3
The exact content and depth in which each of these topics will be covered will be dependent on whether your child is following the support, core or able scheme of work.
Year 7

Topics

Induction activities

Using Numbers

Sequences

Perimeter and Area

Decimal Numbers

Working with Numbers

Statistics

Algebra

Fractions

Angles

Coordinates and Graphs

Percentages

Probability

Symmetry

Equations

Interpreting Data

3D shapes

Ratio

Year 8

Topics

Working with Numbers

Geometry

Geometry/ Assess

Probability

Percentages

Sequences

Area of 2D & 3D shapes

Graphs

Simplifying Numbers

Interpreting Data

Algebra

Congruence and scaling

Fractions and Decimals

Proportion

Circles

Equations and Formulae

Comparing Data

Recommended support resources for Years 7 and 8 are Collins Connect and My Maths
GCSE Mathematics
The depth to which your child will cover each topic may vary depending on their ability group and rate of progress.
Year 9 Higher

Topics

Basic Number

Fractions, Ratio and Proportion

Statistical Diagrams

Number Sequences

Ratio and Proportion

Angles

Transformations

Algebraic Manipulation

Length, Area and Volume

Linear Graphs

Right-angles Triangles

End of Year Assessment

Year 9 Foundation

Topics

Basic Number

Measures and Scale Drawing

Charts, tables, Averages

Angles

Number Properties

Approximations

Decimals and Fractions

Linear Graphs

Expressions and Formulae

Ratio, Speed and Proportion

End of year assessment

Year 10 Higher

Topics

Similarity

Exploring and Applying Probability

Powers and Standard Form

Equations and Inequalities

Accuracy and Surds

Quadratic Equations

End of Year Assessment

Year 10 Foundation

Topics

Perimeter and Area

Transformations

Probability and Events

Volumes, Surface Area

Linear Equations

Percentages and Compound Measures

Percentages and Variation

Statistics

Construction and Loci

End of Year Assessment

Year 11 Higher

Topics

Sampling and More Complex Diagrams

Combined Events

Properties of Circles

Variation

Triangles

Graphs

Algebraic Fractions and Functions

Vector Geometry

Revision

Final Examination

Year 11 Foundation

Topics

Curved shapes and Pyramids

Number and Sequences

Right-angled Triangles

Congruency and Similarity

Probability: Combined Events

Powers and Standard Form

Simultaneous Equations

Linear Inequalities

Non-linear Graphs

Revision

Final Examination

Recommended support resources for Years 9 to 11 are Collins Connect, My Maths and Maths Watch
KS4 Qualifications

AQA GCSE Mathematics Linear (8300)

Students who require extra

support may be offered

AQA Entry Level Course (5930)

In MFL we aspire to use the Target Language in every day college life, and to develop a knowledge of language to be used outside school: on holiday, in a future work situation for example. We are committed to learn all key and topic specific vocabulary as well as all grammar points and tenses. We are also committed be curious and to learn about the culture and customs of the people who live in French speaking countries. We are successful when we build on previous knowledge in order to achieve the higher grade we are capable of.

Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11
Vocabulary
  • Hobbies
  • Home
  • School and clothes
  • Daily routine
  • French speaking countries
  • Me & my family
  • Health
  • Media
  • Holiday
  • Customs
  • Free time
  • Home
  • School
  • Technology
  • Travel
  • Festivals
  • Technology
  • Global issues
  • Social issues
  • Post-16
  • Identity and Culture
  • Local, national and Global areas of interest
  • Study and Employment
Grammar
  • Masculine / feminine, singular / plural
  • Adjective, adverb, comparative, superlative
  • Conjugated verb + infinitive
  • Clauses
  • Masculine / feminine, singular / plural
  • Conjugated verb + infinitive
  • Adjective, adverb, comparative, superlative
  • Negative
  • Complex structures
  • Masculine / feminine, singular / plural
  • Adjective, adverb, comparative, superlative
  • Conjugated verb + infinitive
  • Negative
  • Clauses
  • Complex structures
  • Masculine / feminine, singular / plural
  • Adjective, adverb, comparative, superlative
  • Conjugated verb + infinitive
  • Negative
  • Clauses
  • Object pronouns
  • Complex structures
  • Masculine / feminine, singular / plural
  • Adjective, adverb, comparative, superlative
  • Conjugated verb + infinitive
  • Negative
  • Clauses
  • Object pronouns
  • Complex structures
Tenses
  • Present tense
  • Perfect tense
  • Near future tense
  • Present tense
  • Perfect tense
  • Future tense
  • Present tense
  • Perfect tense
  • Imperfect tense
  • Pluperfect tense
  • Near future tense
  • Future tense
  • Conditional
  • Present tense
  • Imperfect tense
  • Pluperfect tense
  • Subjunctive
  • Present tense
  • Perfect tense
  • Imperfect tense
  • Pluperfect tense
  • Near future tense
  • Future tense
  • Conditional
  • Subjunctive
Skills
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing

Crown Hills Community College IT & Computing Overview

The IT & Computing department presently has three dedicated rooms, each well equipped with PCs and an electronic white board for teaching purposes. A further room is to be built as part of the expansion of the college.

The college has a range of technology in each zone including Laptops, and iPads that can be hired out by each faculty.

Curriculum & Modes of Study Overview

Our vibrant and forward thinking Computing department teach the following modes of study to students in Key Stage 3:

Students in Years 7-8 have one discrete Computing lesson per week.

They are taught in mixed ability groups.

Schemes of work follow the National Curriculum and are constantly reviewed and updated to meet the ever changing needs of our students and governmental changes.

At key points in the curriculum students are assessed to reinforce their learning.

In Year 9 students are currently taught toward their KS4 GCSE, fine tuning skills taught through year7 and 8 with new emphasis on Computing Science, programming and computational thinking.

Key Stage 3 students will be able to:

  • Collaborate on projects
  • Use skills that combine multiple software applications across a range of devices
  • Collect and analyse data and information to meet the needs of a given target audience
  • Create, reuse and repurpose digital information and content
  • Understand and plan for copyright and intellectual property laws
  • Use two programming languages
  • Understand hardware and software components
  • Explain network topologies
  • Understand how to stay eSafe and advise others how to do the same
  • Understand maths for Computing – binary
  • Use control systems to model systems i.e. traffic lights

Key Stage 4 students

All our students will have the opportunity to take qualifications in aspects of GCSE Computing or Creative iMedia, which lead to progression for higher levels of study at college, or within a professional career.

ROUTES FOR PROGRESSION:

Students wishing to continue in this subject will be able to progress to A Level ICT. Students who do not wish to study ICT further will be able to use their ICT skills to assist other A Level subjects. Students wishing to go to College will be able to use their ICT skills to assist whichever course they pursue; Students going into Apprenticeships will clearly be able to show employers and trainers the level of their ICT competence using a recognised qualification, especially in the areas covered by the units outlined below.

Creative iMedia GCSE

Creative iMedia

If you like creating things on the computer, then Creative iMedia is the course you might choose.

It has 4 units, 3 of them are based on your coursework in making and changing images using Photoshop, making webpages and making games using Game Maker. One unit has a written exam to do, which is done in January of Year 10, but may be retaken if needed. All the 4 units are worth 25% of the overall grade each.

By taking this option you will be taking a Level 2 VCF course (not a BTEC) from OCR.

You will have the potential to gain GCSE grades 1 – 9 on successful completion of the course. A sample of typical units is listed below with explanation of the skillset assessed on the unit.

  • R081: Pre-production skills.  This is a compulsory unit, based on all aspects of planning projects from Mood boards to Gantt Charts. It will also develop their understanding of the client brief, time frames, deadlines and preparation techniques that form part of the planning and creation process. For the assessment of this unit, the students will be entered for an exam, which may be retaken if needed.
  • R082: Creating digital graphics.  This is also a compulsory unit, in which Photoshop is used to edit photographs and images to suit given situations. For the assessment of this unit, students will complete a 10 hour controlled assessment which is marked by the teaching staff and externally moderated.
  • R085: Creating a multiple website. In this unit, Students will have the opportunity to understand the basics of creating multiple websites through this unit. They will also be able to demonstrate their creativity by combining components to create a functional, intuitive and aesthetically pleasing website using Dreamweaver or Web Plus. For the assessment of this unit students will complete a 10 hour controlled assessment which is marked by the teaching staff and externally moderated.
  • R092: Developing digital games. Through this unit, students will examine the basics of creating digital games and their environments for the creative and digital media sector. They will also develop the know-how to create a playable game from an existing design or brief. For the assessment of this unit, students will complete a 10 hour controlled assessment which is marked by the teaching staff and externally moderated.

Click here for Information about OCR iMedia GCSE Qualification

Crown Hills Community College IT & Computing Overview

The IT & Computing department presently has three dedicated rooms, each well equipped with PCs and an electronic white board for teaching purposes. A further room is to be built as part of the expansion of the college.

The college has a range of technology in each zone including Laptops, and iPads that can be hired out by each faculty.

Curriculum & Modes of Study Overview

Our vibrant and forward thinking Computing department teach the following modes of study to students in Key Stage 3:

Students in Years 7-8 have one discrete Computing lesson per week.

They are taught in mixed ability groups.

Schemes of work follow the National Curriculum and are constantly reviewed and updated to meet the ever changing needs of our students and governmental changes.

At key points in the curriculum students are assessed to reinforce their learning.

In Year 9 students are currently taught toward their KS4 GCSE, fine tuning skills taught through year7 and 8 with new emphasis on Computing Science, programming and computational thinking.

Key Stage 3 students will be able to:

  • Collaborate on projects
  • Use skills that combine multiple software applications across a range of devices
  • Collect and analyse data and information to meet the needs of a given target audience
  • Create, reuse and repurpose digital information and content
  • Understand and plan for copyright and intellectual property laws
  • Use two programming languages
  • Understand hardware and software components
  • Explain network topologies
  • Understand how to stay eSafe and advise others how to do the same
  • Understand maths for Computing – binary
  • Use control systems to model systems i.e. traffic lights

Key Stage 4 students

All our students will have the opportunity to take qualifications in aspects of GCSE Computing or Creative iMedia, which lead to progression for higher levels of study at college, or within a professional career.

ROUTES FOR PROGRESSION:

Students wishing to continue in this subject will be able to progress to A Level ICT. Students who do not wish to study ICT further will be able to use their ICT skills to assist other A Level subjects. Students wishing to go to College will be able to use their ICT skills to assist whichever course they pursue; Students going into Apprenticeships will clearly be able to show employers and trainers the level of their ICT competence using a recognised qualification, especially in the areas covered by the units outlined below.

Computer Science

This carefully planned course gives students a real in-depth understanding of how computer technology works.

It offers an insight into what goes on ‘behind the scenes’, including computer programming.

For suitable KS4 Computing students they will learn to do the following:

  • Develop their understanding of current and emerging technologies and how they work.
  • Look at the use of algorithms in computer programs
  • Become independent and discerning users of IT
  • Acquire and apply creative and technical skills, knowledge and understanding of Computing in a range of contexts
  • Develop computer programs to solve problems
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of computer programs/solutions and impact of computer technology in society

Assessment:

You will have the potential to gain a GCSE Computing Science qualification graded 1-9; with exam and range of topics supplied by OCR.  This is an Ebaccalaureate subject option.  The course is assessed by a written paper, which has a mixture of short and long answer questions, some of which require students to write program code.  This course is 100% assessed by external examination.

Click here for Information about OCR GCSE Computing Qualification

Here at Crown Hills, we are committed to encouraging all our pupils to read widely for pleasure. Literacy skills underpin all aspects of academic learning and education and there is no refuting the evidence that a reading child is a successful child.

A number of initiatives are currently in place at Crown Hills to support, encourage and develop the reading skills of all of our pupils. We ensure that every child in the school has fifteen minutes of dedicated literacy development time for four mornings each week, adding up to an hour each week.

All our pupils are tested to establish their reading levels, and a number of interventions are in place to develop pupils’ confidence and skills. One of these initiatives is the VIP (the Vocabulary Improvement Programme), a 12 lesson unit of work designed to develop the vocabulary, reading and writing skills of pupils falling about 2 years below their actual age in terms of reading comprehension. 52 pupils in years 7 and 8 have completed the programme so far, and of these, 40 have shown a significant improvement in their reading, with an average increase of 2 years in the space of a few weeks. This is a 77% success rate and we plan to continue and expand the programme in the future.

All pupils are issued with their reading ages and our library is extremely well stocked with books tailored to all reading abilities; pupils are able to find books appropriately challenging but accessible for their age and ability. To support this, our Librarian has painstakingly taken the time to ensure all books are labelled with reading age needed for the content. Many of our more able readers become Leaders of Literacy and support their peers with reading and other literacy development strategies. Likewise, all teaching staff have access to the reading ages of pupils in their classes and tailor their lessons and reading materials to match the needs of the children.

A recent reading survey, conducted by a third party, has provided some very encouraging results in regard to our pupils’ attitude towards reading for pleasure. These include:

o The percentage of pupils liking the books Crown Hills has to offer continues to rise.

o At Crown Hills a higher percentage of boys than girls want to become a better reader.

o 76% of pupils felt that regular readers are people “who want to do well”.

o 85% of pupils who completed the survey said they enjoy reading.

o 85% of our pupils who completed the reading survey, read at home for pleasure at least once per week.

o 24% of pupils read for pleasure at home every day.

A number of students at Crown Hills College have difficulties with reading. Some students have learning difficulties and others are new to English. We strive to identify students, through one to one assessments, for additional support to develop their reading. Once identified, we use appropriate interventions. We deliver Read Write Inc. Fresh Start to students with limited reading skills. This is a phonic based intervention which aims to secure phonic knowledge and decoding. For students at the next level, we deliver Rapid Plus during morning literacy time. This aims to boost reading comprehension, and students have made great leaps in their reading through this.

There are a number of students at Crown Hills who are new to English and are supported by the EAL department. The EAL staff support reading through reading groups during literacy time. These groups focus on building vocabulary and high frequency words. They use the Oxford Reading Tree for the new arrivals. For the students who have been in the country for a longer period of time, the EAL staff also use Rapid Plus. Last year, some EAL students from Year 11 were used as group leaders to support Year 8 EAL students with their reading. This was successful and so the same is planned for this academic year. During morning literacy time, we also deliver Lexia, an online literacy intervention, to larger groups of students. The results from our trial of Lexia were fantastic in giving a boost to reading and spelling skills. For some students, reading comprehension and ‘reading between the lines’ are more of a challenge. For these students we can deliver Inference Training in small groups.

YEAR 7 CATCH-UP GRANT FOR 2014/2015
Details Income Expenditure
Year 7 Catch Up Grant 2014/15  33,500.00
Resources 84.45
Tutor 7,900.00
Tutor 7,806.11
Total 33,500.00 15,709.56
Balance 17,709.44

Balance of £17,709.44 will cover Tutors Salary for this academic year (2015/16) as we have not been notified if funding is to continue.

English At Crown Hills Community College
Year 7 & 8

English Language & Literature

Students will engage with poetry, plays, novels and a variety of non-fiction texts.

Students will write creatively and respond critically to texts.

Speaking & Listening activities will take place throughout the years.

Students will undertake two author studies a year.

Students will complete reading and writing assessments which mirror the questions they will be asked in their AQA examinations in Y11.

Students will sit two exam papers which mirror exactly what they will face in their exams in Y11.

Students will learn through a variety of teaching methods such as: paired work, group work, drama based responses, independent enquiry, becoming an expert and teaching others, using technology as a learning aid and using thinking methods.

Year 9

English Literature GCSE (Year 1)

Students will begin their GCSE English Literature course in preparation for their examination at the end of Y10 if they are ready, Year 11 if they are not.

Students will write creatively and respond critically to texts.

Speaking & Listening activities will take place throughout the year.

Students will study texts which will prepare them for their exam texts.

Students will complete reading and writing assessments which mirror the questions they will be asked in their AQA examinations in Y10/11.

Students will sit two exam papers which mirror exactly what they will face in their exams in Y10/Y11.

Students will learn through a variety of teaching methods such as: paired work, group work, drama based responses, independent enquiry, becoming an expert and teaching others, using technology as a learning aid and using thinking methods.

Year 10 & 11

English Language and English Literature GCSE

Students study the AQA exam board.

They will study for two separate GCSEs.

Each exam is 100% final exam; there is no longer any coursework or controlled assessments.

There is now only one tier of entry. Every student attempts the same exam paper.

Grades will be given from 1-9.

Students will learn through a variety of teaching methods such as: paired work, group work, drama based responses, independent enquiry, becoming an expert and teaching others, using technology as a learning aid and using thinking methods.

English Language

Students must complete one Spoken Language assessment that is recorded but does not contribute to the overall grade.

Paper One is fiction based and lasts 1 hour and 45 minutes.

Students will answer 4 questions in response to a fiction extract.

Students will complete one written response – either a piece of description or a narrative.

Paper Two is non-fiction based and lasts 1 hour and 45 minutes.

Students will answer 4 questions in response to two non-fiction extracts.

Students will complete one written response – either a letter, article, leaflet, essay or speech.

English Literature

Paper One asks students to respond to a Shakespeare play and a pre-20th century novel and lasts for 1 hour and 45 minutes.

Paper Two asks students to respond to a modern text, two studied poems and two unseen poems and lasts for 2 hours and 15 minutes.

Texts that may be studied include:

‘Macbeth’

‘Romeo & Juliet’

‘Much Ado About Nothing’

‘A Christmas Carol’

‘An Inspector Calls’

‘Animal Farm’

‘The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time’

A Poetry Anthology.

Practice Exam Questions

A Christmas Carol Practice Exam Questions

An Inspector Calls Practice Exam Questions

Animal Farm Practice Exam Questions

English Language Paper 1 Practice tests

Macbeth Practice Exam Questions

Much Ado About Nothing Practice Exam Questions

Power and Conflict Poetry Practice Exam Questions

Romeo and Juliet Practice Exam Questions

Unseen Poetry Practice Exam Questions

Narrative and Descriptive Questions English Language Paper 1

Key Stage 3

Students complete a 2 year Key Stage 3 course, studying topics across Biology, Chemistry and Physics

There are 10 major areas of study, each area contains 4 topics, making 40 topics in total.

These are studied across Years 7 and 8. The areas of study are:

1. Forces

2. Electricity and magnetism

3. Energy

4. Waves

5. Matter

6. Chemical Reactions

7. Earth and Space

8. The Human Reproductive System

9. Organisms

10. Ecosystems

11. Genes

Key Stage 4

Students study for their GCSE across Years 9, 10 and 11.

The Science GCSE is a double award and students receive 2 grades.

Students will take 6 exams at the end of the course; there is no controlled assessment.

Students study topics across Biology, Chemistry and Physics

Biology Chemistry Physics
1. Cell Biology 8. Atomic structure and the periodic table 18. Energy
2. Organisation 9. Bonding, structure, and the properties of matter 19. Electricity
3. Infection and response 10. Quantitative chemistry 20. Particle model of matter
4. Bioenergetics 11. Chemical changes 21. Atomic structure
5. Homeostasis and response 12. Energy changes 22. Forces
6. Inheritance, variation and evolution 13. The rate and extent of chemical change 23. Waves
7. Ecology 14. Organic chemistry 24. Magnetism and electromagnetism
15. Chemical analysis
16. Chemistry of the atmosphere
17. Using resources

At crown Hills we offer one of the most varied and all encompassing DT curriculums of any inner city school.

7 different materials based learning areas delivering project based learning rich in practical skill based experiences:

Woods and Timbers

Metal and Polymers

Product Design (electronics)

Fashion and Textiles

Food Preparation Nutrition

Graphics (Computer Aided Design)

STEM: Exploring applications for our scientific understanding of forces and human digestion.

While many schools are reducing the number of lessons or the range of experiences offered in this subject area, Crown Hills takes pride in its ongoing commitment to developing its allocation for this valuable subject.

Curriculum At KS3

Students begin Y7 in Design Technology with a 4 week key skills program to develop the core design techniques needed for success in each material area (the program is currently being updated to integrate with all aspects of the new 2017 specification).

Over the next 2 years they then rotate through the 7 material areas completing an extended design and manufacture project in each area (10 weeks in length).

Independent Enquiry Learning at KS3

STEM (science, Technology, Engineering and maths) is a hot topic at the moment both in industry and in schools.

The Crown Hills Discovery Zone is where maths, science and DT work together to prepare students for further STEM studies and to encourage them to aspire to careers in this exciting and rapidly developing industry.

Our vision for Design Technology is that it should provide the contextual application of maths and science linked with problem solving, creativity and practical skills that are at the core of the DT curriculum.

KS3 Students now take part in two STEM projects as part of their DT lessons.

These projects are delivered with a focus on personal investigation, discovery and involve independent learning journeys that are directed by the students

Curriculum At KS4

At the end of Y8 students make their options choices and can select one “specialist” area of Design Technology to continue with to GCSE level

The last 6 weeks of Y8 is used for transition work to prepare students for the more demanding expectations for success at KS4

KS4 GCSE courses

AQA 1-9 Design Technology

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/design-and-technology/gcse/design-and-technology-8552

This is the new generic qualification for all students wishing to study resistant materials, graphics or textiles at GCSE. Single specialism qualifications are no longer offered by any exam board.

Current teachers:

Mr. J. Hallett (HoF)- Graphics

Mr. P. Newbold, Mr. S. Marston and Miss Rebelo- Resistant Materials

Miss Sagoo and Mrs Marshall- Textiles

In Year 9

Students refine and develop existing skills and build new knowledge and understanding through theory based taught lessons (assessed through class work, homework and test results) as well as creating practical test pieces. Periodically they will also undertake a number of small mini projects so they have a chance to apply everything they have learnt independently.

In Year 10

Student’s theoretical knowledge is developed so they can apply it successfully in different situations. Through personal reflection practical skills are also refined and improved. Students are exposed to user evaluation techniques and how to accurately test their final outcomes. The year concludes with a “mock” NEA (Non Externally Assessed) coursework projects. On the first of June the 3 starting points or themes for the actual NEA coursework will be released by the exam board.

Over the summer holiday former Y10 students should be completing a significant body of research work for their NEA

In Year 11

Students focus the first 15 weeks on completing their 40-hour NEA coursework project (50% of the total final grade). The remainder of the year is spent preparing for the final exam in July)

AQA 1-9 Food Preparation and Nutrition

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/food

Current teachers:

Miss K. Clayton

Miss B. Parra

In Year 9

In Year 10

 In Year 11

Supporting Student Aspiration and Success

New for 2018 Our careers and “wider emersion” project. Linking what are pupils learn in the classroom to a future career. We offer enrichment activities involving professional speakers, industrial visits, high quality work experience placement scholarships, entering work into national competitions and recently, working with 3rd party organisations including Universities to run projects that are delivered by university students and their lecturers.

Lunchtime drop ins for KS 3 and 4. To support those who are struggling and to challenge those who are more able Design Technology classrooms and workshops are open at lunch and after school. During this time a wide variety of activities take place. Targeted intervention on tricky practical skills, exploring the bigger picture around key topics to broaden the knowledge of our most able or maybe just making lolly pop stick catapults in engineering club! – There is always something interesting going on at lunch time- come and get involved.

Learning Apps

https://www.gethopscotch.com

Hopskotch

Hopskotch is an iPad app that allows kids to program their own games and animations, letting their creativity run wild while learning the basics of programming. Inspired by MIT’s Scratch, the app is ranked #6 in the AppStore’s Education section and is recommended for students aged eight and up.

https://www.sketchup.com/products/sketchup-free

SketchUp

SketchUp Free is the simplest, easiest-to-use 3D free modeler around. You don’t need thousands of buttons and dropdowns for 3D drawing: you do need space to draw. It loads in modern web browsers on any operating system. Also sketchUp Free is versionless: you’re always using the fastest, most up-to-date iteration.

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/autodesk-sketchbook/id883738213?mt=8

Autodesk Sketchbook

Autodesk are the industry leaders for computer aided design software. This is their flagship professional drawing package for tablet and phone, which is now available for free!

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/adobe-photoshop-sketch/id839085644?mt=8

Adobe Photoshop Sketch

Adobe Photoshop Sketch presents artists with familiar Photoshop drawing tools, including a graphite pencil, ink pen, blending markers and an eraser, as well as brushes including acrylic and pastel.

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/adobe-illustrator-draw/id911156590?mt=8

Adobe Illustrator Draw

You can create vector art with Illustrator Draw, with lots of handy tools at your fingertips to make the experience easier and more efficient. You’ll be able to create perfect lines and curves thanks to the Touch Slide digital ruler, and add images from multiple sources

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/adobe-capture-cc/id1040200189?mt=8

Adobe Capture CC

Adobe Capture CC turns your iPhone and iPad into a creation machine. Imagine looking through your camera to see patterns, vectors, and even fonts. Now imagine turning those into brushes, textures and shapes you can use in Photoshop!

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/everycircuit/id797157761?mt=8

Every Circuit

Build any circuit, tap play button, and watch dynamic voltage, current, and charge animations. This gives you insight into circuit operation like no equation does. While simulation is running, adjust circuit parameters with analog knob, and the circuit responds

https://itunes.apple.com/kw/app/design-and-technology-resistant-materials/id383019810?mt=8

Design Technology: Resistant Materials

The successful DT App has now been split into individual subjects so you can learn and revise the subject of your choice at a fantastic price. The application includes information and revision quizzes for Resistant Materials as well as general guidance for coursework and controlled assessment tasks (cost £0.99)

https://itunes.apple.com/kw/app/design-and-technology-food-technology/id510434584?mt=8

Design Technology: Food Technology

The successful D&T App has continued to grow and include Food Technology. Now available as an individual application you can learn and revise key topics for your GCSE exam and course work assessments (cost £0.99)

The Expressive Arts Faculty is divided into four different departments: Art, Dance, Drama & Music

At Key Stage 3 each student studies the four Expressive Arts subjects in rotation each year.

At Key Stage 4 students choose Expressive Arts subjects from a list of options that includes subjects from other faculties.

Each Expressive Arts Department offers extra-curricular activities and lessons at lunchtime and after school.

Each department also offers opportunities for students to perform or display their work and go on trips as part of the curriculum.

Art

Key Stage 3 – Students study the National Curriculum for Art learning to develop their creativity and ideas, and improve their artistic skills.

They also learn to understand the work of artists and designers throughout history and up to the present day. They learn to use a range of techniques and materials and understand how to evaluate their work.

Key Stage 4

Year 10 AQA GCSE Art & Design Syllabus 8201.

Year 11 AQA GCSE Art & Design Syllabus 4201.

Extra-curricular Art – Art Clubs are available at lunchtime and after school for Key Stage 3 & 4.

Dance

Key Stage 3 – Dance – Students create and devise their own choreographed work using skills and techniques taught in class alongside the promotion of physical education, health and body awareness.

Key Stage 4 – Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 in Performing Arts

Extra-curricular Dance includes Indian Garba and Bhangra.

Drama

Key Stage 3 – Students learn to improvise, rehearse and perform their own drama using role, intonation, tone, volume, mood, silence, stillness and action to add impact.

Students discover through the use of the drama medium elements of drama and explorative strategies.

Develop confidence, communication skills, creativity and self-esteem.

Key Stage 4

Year 11 Drama Edexcel GCSE Syllabus 2DR01.

Year 10 Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 in Performing Arts – Acting.

Music

Key Stage 3

Year 7 – Students learn the basics of Music Notation by learning simple tunes on the electronic keyboard and the use of music technology.They find out about the elements of Music.

Students learn ensemble and solo performance skills, about African rhythms and melodies and how to improvise.

Year 8 – Students learn about Indian Music Notation and how to compose their own Indian Music using a Raga.

They also learn a Bollywood melody and remix it to create their own version.

Year 9 – Students learn about Blues Music, and explore how Pop music developed from Blues through other styles and genres to what it is today.

They learn how this music is composed and put together using rhythms, chords, riffs and bass lines.

They also learn about how music is used by the media

Key Stage 4

Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Music

The Music Department offers an extensive extra-curricular timetable of instrumental lessons and ensemble groups.

Parents/Carers may find the following links helpful:

Leicester-Shire Music Education Hub

My Panyard

D-E-A Classes and Tuition

Please find below links to music from our Steel Bands

Merry Christmas

Footsteps

The Lion Sleeps Tonight

Soul Limbo

Just the way you are

Little Mermaid

Stand By Me

Yellow Submarine

All pupils at Crown Hills Community College have two lessons a week on Citizenship and PSHEE (Personal Health and Economic Education) in KS3.

Citizenship education is about enabling pupils to make their own decisions and to take responsibility for their own lives as well as taking in interest and participating in local, national and international issues.

We encourage students to understand their rights and responsibilities and become ‘model’, ‘good’ and ‘active’ citizens both in school and in their futures.

We encourage pupils to relate to real life events, controversial and topical issues that encourage and develop thinking, research and debating skills as well as numeracy and literacy skills.

Our PSHEE lessons develop self-confidence and strategies to deal with lifes challenges and explore opportunities of adult and working life.

Citizenship and PSHEE is about developing :

•Knowledge and understanding:

•Skills and aptitudes: Critical thinking, analysing information, expressing opinions, taking part in discussions, debates, negotiating, conflict resolution and participating in community action.

•Values and dispositions: Respect for justice, democracy and the rule of law, openness, tolerance, courage to defend a point of view and a willingness to listen to, work with and stand up for others.

Citizenship and PSHEE is important because it addresses real issues, relating to social justice, human rights, community cohesion and developing students SMSC awareness (Social, Moral, Spiritual and Cultural) both now and in the future.

The Life Skills KS3 Curriculum at a glance

Year 7 Year 8 Year 9
Citizenship 1 = Rules, fairness, rights & responsibilities, the work of the school council, having your say and democracy. Citizenship 1 = Rules, fairness, rights & responsibilities, the Law, ASBO’s, young offenders, gangs, mock trial, sentencing and the youth offending team. Citizenship 1 = Rules, fairness, responsibilities, justice, Human Rights, police rights, surveillance, terrorism, freedom of information and equality.
Citizenship 2 = Communities and identities, being good and active citizens, changing our community and bringing communities together. Citizenship 2 = Local communities and local government involves understanding local issues, the work of the council, stereotyping, racism, sexism, discrimination and the law. Citizenship 2 = National Government and National Politics, political parties, various voting systems, role of MP’s, Houses of Parliament, law making, pressure groups, UK Government and the monarchy.
Citizenship 3 = Being a global citizen, understanding child labour, Fair trade, charity and volunteering. Citizenship 3 = Human rights in a global community, refugees, migration, media and the free press. Citizenship 3 = Britain and the world: Europe, the Commonwealth, United Nations, Northern Ireland and South Africa.
PSHEE 1 = Understanding yourself and relationships. (Including anti-bullying week). Dealing with homework, family issues, domestic violence etc. PSHEE 1 = Understanding yourself and relationships looks at self-esteem, shyness, leisure time, beating boredom, divided families, domestic violence, friendship, culture, lifestyle and influences. We also investigate stereotypes. PSHEE 1 = Understanding yourself and relationships looks at becoming an adult, dealing with loss and bereavement, assertive behaviour, mental illness and racism.
PSHEE 2 = You and your money, looks at money management and being a consumer. PSHEE 2 = You and your money investigates financial risks and gambling awareness. PSHEE 2 = You and your money looks at banking, savings and being a green consumer.
PSHEE 3 = You and work, looks at skills, qualities, qualifications, doing market research, designing, marketing and presenting a product as a group. PSHEE 3 = You and work looks at the organisation of firms, employment and unemployment, different industries, finance, risk and profit. PSHEE 3 = You and work looks at decision making, knowing our strengths, skills and qualities.(including the Options module) and undertaking careers research.
PSHEE 4 = You and your body: looks at puberty and the awareness of drugs and smoking. PSHEE 4 = Keeping healthy looks at the risk and awareness of alcohol and drugs, physical safety at home and in the streets PSHEE 4 =You and your body looks at adolescence, eating disorders, drugs awareness, positive body image, physical safety, relationships and STI’s

In KS4, (year 10 and 11) pupils undertake a GCSE in Humanities (AQA Board), this integrates religious studies, history, geography and Life Skills.

Students look at four key areas, they are examined on this and the exam is worth 75% of their final grade.

In addition, pupils work independently to complete a 2,000 word essay in controlled conditions with support from their Life Skills teacher.

This is worth 25% of the final grade.

Pupils are provided with a source booklet prior to the exam to work from, annotate and prepare for prior to the exam.

Culture and Core Beliefs

• Understanding common and contrasting cultures

• Understanding simple and complex cultures

• Understanding subculture, agents of socialisation, identity and IQ

• Understanding the nature V nurture debate

• Understanding laws, morals values, beliefs and rituals

• Understanding migration and multiculturalism

• Investigating social, moral, political or religious issues (capital punishment, euthanasia, medical ethics, the monarchy etc)

Conflict and Cooperation

• Understanding causes and effects of conflict.

• Understanding Human Rights, freedoms and responsibilities.

• Conflict at a local level (bullying)

• Conflict at a national level (apartheid and South Africa)

• Conflict at an international level (Rwanda)

• Students have the opportunity to select other conflicts i.e. Syria, Palestine, Afghanistan, Iraq as case studies etc.

Environment

• Environmental problems (pollution, global warming, habitats, climate change, exploitation, tourism etc.)

• Understanding renewable and non-renewable resources

• Looking at the energy crises

• Individual and group responses to the environment, the work of political groups, pressure groups and business

• Solutions to environmental problems

• Investigating case studies: Tropical rainforests, deforestation, coral reefs etc.

• Investigating sustainable solutions

• Investigating National Parks

People and work

• Understanding the relevance of work in different cultures

• Motivations for work

• Understanding leisure and work satisfaction

• Understanding the impact of unemployment

• Understanding the impact of technology

• Understanding the three main employment sectors

• Explaining globalisation and multinational companies and the change in working patterns

• Looking at economic migration

• Investigating case studies involving conflict in the workplace, equality legislation and the role of trade unions

In 2016, the faculty has also started delivering Citizenship GCSE at KS4

This is 100% exam based and includes the following topics

RIGHTS, THE LAW AND THE LEGAL SYSTEM IN ENGLAND AND WALES DEMOCRACY AND GOVERNMENT THE UK AND THE WIDER WORLD
Rights and responsibilities Democracy, elections and voting in the UK Identities and diveristy in the UK society
The law National, local, regional and devolved government The UK and its relations with the wider world.
The legal system The British Constitution
The economy, finance and money
The role of the media and free press
Citizenship participation and action
Politics beyond the UK

Please encourage your child to use sophisticated vocubulary, watch/read the news and develop an opinion on what is going on locally, nationall and internationally.

Try to discuss current affairs with them and encourage them to attend the numerous revision sessions that the school offers during lunchtimes and after school.

Revision booklets are provided closer to the exams.

In addition we teach a one off Life Skills lesson which prepares students for the wider world.

Students look at:

Financial Management Work SRE British Values
Consumer/Banking/ Debt/ Financial Management Economic Enterprise/understanding payslips/insurance CV’s, letters of application, UCAS, personal statements, charity work and volunteering Teenage Parent Contraception lesson SR awareness Forced marriage Mental Health Eating disorders Homophobia Legal Highs/Shisha Smoking SEN/Drug Awareness Diabetic awareness Cancer awareness Radicalisation Gang Culture Knife Crime Anti-Social Behavior

HISTORY CURRICULUM

Year 7

Autumn – Spring Term

Crown Vs the people – A study looking at the actions of different monarchs and key characters in history between 1066 and 1400 and considering how these have shaped Britain including people such as William the Conqueror, Simon de Montfort, Henry II, Thomas Becket. We also look at what life was like in this time considering issues such as the Black Death.

Spring – Summer Term

Turbulent Tudors- An in depth look at the different Tudor monarchs and how they helped to shape Britain. We consider the changes to religion they brought as well as moving on to look at the Stuarts.

Year 8

Autumn term

Empire to equality – An outline study considering the Slave trade and its abolition, as well as life for Black Americans in 20th Century America.

Spring term

The Industrial Revolution – A depth study considering the changes in Britain between 1750 and 1850 including the rise of factories and the working conditions for child labourers.

Summer term

Conflict in the twentieth century- A thematic study looking at how conflict has evolved and developed over the last 100 years considering events such as WW1, WW2, the dropping of the atomic bomb, the Vietnam was as well as modern day terrorism.

Year 9

Autumn – Spring Term

America 1910-1929- Starting the GCSE syllabus this module looks at developments in America such as the intolerance faced by immigrants, political factions and black Americans. We also look at the economic issues surrounding the economic boom of the 1920s leading to eventual Wall Street Crash in 1929. We finish the topic looking at the social side of the 1920s looking at what people did for fun and attitudes to women and how these developed over the period.

Spring – Summer Term

The development of Germany 1919-1991- our second GCSE module looks at the development of Germany from 1919 with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles through Hitler’s reign all the way through the cold war culminating in the tearing down of the Berlin wall in 1989 and the aftermath and impact on Germany.

Year 10- Eduqas specification

Autumn Term

The Elizabethan Age, 1558-1603- We look at how Elizabeth gained control over the country, the issues she had with religion and foreign powers alongside how her reign impacted upon normal people in society.

Spring Term

Changes in Health and Medicine in Britain, c.500 to the present day- We look thematically at key figures and influences in the changing of medicine.

Year 11

Recap of the year 9 and 10 modules with focussed revision.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES CURRICULUM

Year 7

Autumn Term

Introduction to Religious studies, Philosophy and Ethics – A study of the identity of God across religions

Creation Theory and Identity of God – A study of views of creation with a philosophical look to scientific and religious creation theory.

Spring Term

Founders and Pilgrimage – A study of founders, key figures and pilgrimage within religion

Festivals

Summer Term – No RS as Humanities rotations

Year 8

Autumn – Spring Term

Holy books and Moral codes – A study into holy books and moral codes with an investigation into medical ethics

Spring – Summer Term

Founders and Pilgrimage – A study of founders, key figures and pilgrimage within religion

Year 9 Autumn – Spring Term

Founders and Pilgrimage – A study of founders, key figures and pilgrimage within religion

Spring – Summer Term

Worship Beliefs and Practices – A study of beliefs and practices of religious groups

Year 10 – WJEC Eduqas GCSE in Religious Studies

Autumn Term

COMPONENT 2 – Christian Beliefs and Teachings

COMPNENT 3 – Hindu Beliefs & Teaching

Spring Term

COMPONENT 1 – Issues of Relationships

COMPONENT 1 – Issues of life and death

Summer Term

COMPONENT 2 – Christianity Practices

Year 11 – OCR B Religion Philosophy and Applied Ethics

Autumn Term

Philosophy 2 – Good and evil

Ethics 2 – Religion, Peace and justice

Spring Term

Philosophy 2 – Religion and Science

Ethics 2 – Religion and the Media

Summer Term

Revision

GEOGRAPHY CURRICULUM

Year 7

Pupils are taught on a rotation so will either study Geography or History for the first half term and then swap in the second half term.

Autumn – Spring Term

An Introduction to Geography incorporating geographical skills e.g. map work

Spring – Summer Term

Weather and climate

Ecosystems

Year 8

Autumn – Spring Term

Coasts

Population

Spring – Summer Term>

Natural hazards

Rivers and flooding

Year 9

OCR A Specification- Geographical Themes.

The course is comprised of 3 units

2 content exams: Living in the UK today (1hr) and The world around us (1hr)

1 fieldwork skills exam

Autumn Term

Paper 1 – Living in the UK today

Landscapes of the UK

People of the UK

Spring Term

Paper 1 – Living in the UK today

Environmental challenges in the UK

Summer Term

Paper 2 – The world around us

Ecosystems

Year 10

Autumn Term

Paper 2 – The world around us

People of the Planet

Environmental Threats

Spring Term

Geographical Skills and fieldwork

Summer Term

Focused and personalised revision to prepare for Mock examinations

Year 11

Recapping of year 9 and 10 topics, practising exam skills and personalised revision

KS 3 and KS 4 PE

The best way of supporting your child will be to encourage them to increase fitness levels and be able to swim at least 25meters.

Encourage them by working with them on fitness activities at home whether this is spending 30mins jogging, cycling, swimming etc.

Activities that will make them out of breath.

Aim to do this 3-5 times a week

Below is a link for Spence street leisure centre showing pool times and possible swimming classes to help your child achieve the 25m goal.

Spence Street Leisure Centre

Potential fitness circuits you could do at home could be searched from the following web link

Home Exercise and Fitness

If your child shows an interest in a sport then take them to a local club to try it out. Use the following link to search the sport of interest.

BBC Get Inspired

Throughout their time in school pupils will be looking to develop Fitness and will be involved in a variety of sports.

These will be done on rotational method.

Sports they might experience Football, Netball, Badminton, Basketball, Cricket, Rounders, Gymnastics, Athletics, Volleyball, Fitness, Table Tennis

Encourage your child to participate in extracurricular activities either inside or outside of school.

KS4 Sport

If your child chooses Sport as an option then they will follow 1 of 2 strands.

OCR National Sport Studies or AQA GCSE Physical Education. The PE faculty will make the decision which is most appropriate for your child.

The following links will give more information on both qualifications

AQA GCSE Physical education

https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/pe/specifications/AQA-8582-SP-2016.PDF

It is vital that students studying this course are involved in competitive sport outside of college and regularly attend extracurricular sporting activities.

OCR National Sports Studies

https://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/82412-specification.pdf

Pupils will complete 4 units.

2 core units. Unit 1 Contemporary issues in sport (Will be an 1 hour exam).

Unit 2 Developing sports skills.

2 optional units. Unit 3 Sports Leadership.

Unit 4 Sport and the media

In Leicester City there are 288 children who have a hearing impairment.

Some hearing losses are greater than others; therefore individual students will require different levels of support.

The majority of students attend their local main stream schools and are support by a Peripatetic Teacher of the Deaf within that setting.

However, there are students who, for a variety of reasons, need more intensive support.

These students are placed here at Crown Hills Community College where there is a unit designed to support Deaf students both academically and socially.

Every day they have access to Teachers of the Deaf and support staff that are specifically trained to teach and support them.

The teacher of the Deaf deliver language based subjects in the unit.

These include English, Humanities and Life Skills.

The rest of the curriculum is delivered in the mainstream setting with support from the specialist staff.

Tutorials are also a big part of the unit support.

During these sessions the students are given time to consolidate subject specific language on a one to one basis.

The unit setting also allows the students to develop their language and communication skills, both of which will be significantly delayed.

Over the years, the number of students who have attended the unit has fluctuated between twelve and one.

At the present time we have four students in the unit: two year 11 and two year 9.

There are a further four students who are taught in the mainstream of the school with support from a Teacher of the Deaf (on a regular basis but not in the unit)

The new facilities in the unit are superb.

The sound proof rooms mean that the students are getting the best possible access to the curriculum.

Hearing tests and equipment checks can be carried out with confidence, knowing that the outcome will be accurate.

Welcome to our subject page.

Please click on the subject you are interested on the left for further curriculum information

We have a balanced curriculum here at Crown Hills, one where your son/daughter will receive a healthy diet of subjects equipping them for college, university and the world of work. We are committed to continually improving educational outcomes and have invested heavily in Maths, English and Science in terms of increased curriculum time.

USEFUL INFORMATION

Assessment Calendar
Bridging the Gap to A level Maths
Foundation revision checklist
Foundation revision schedule
Higher revision checklist
Higher Revision Schedule
Maths Price List
KEY STAGE 3
The exact content and depth in which each of these topics will be covered will be dependent on whether your child is following the support, core or able scheme of work.
Year 7

Topics

Induction activities

Using Numbers

Sequences

Perimeter and Area

Decimal Numbers

Working with Numbers

Statistics

Algebra

Fractions

Angles

Coordinates and Graphs

Percentages

Probability

Symmetry

Equations

Interpreting Data

3D shapes

Ratio

Year 8

Topics

Working with Numbers

Geometry

Geometry/ Assess

Probability

Percentages

Sequences

Area of 2D & 3D shapes

Graphs

Simplifying Numbers

Interpreting Data

Algebra

Congruence and scaling

Fractions and Decimals

Proportion

Circles

Equations and Formulae

Comparing Data

Recommended support resources for Years 7 and 8 are Collins Connect and My Maths
GCSE Mathematics
The depth to which your child will cover each topic may vary depending on their ability group and rate of progress.
Year 9 Higher

Topics

Basic Number

Fractions, Ratio and Proportion

Statistical Diagrams

Number Sequences

Ratio and Proportion

Angles

Transformations

Algebraic Manipulation

Length, Area and Volume

Linear Graphs

Right-angles Triangles

End of Year Assessment

Year 9 Foundation

Topics

Basic Number

Measures and Scale Drawing

Charts, tables, Averages

Angles

Number Properties

Approximations

Decimals and Fractions

Linear Graphs

Expressions and Formulae

Ratio, Speed and Proportion

End of year assessment

Year 10 Higher

Topics

Similarity

Exploring and Applying Probability

Powers and Standard Form

Equations and Inequalities

Accuracy and Surds

Quadratic Equations

End of Year Assessment

Year 10 Foundation

Topics

Perimeter and Area

Transformations

Probability and Events

Volumes, Surface Area

Linear Equations

Percentages and Compound Measures

Percentages and Variation

Statistics

Construction and Loci

End of Year Assessment

Year 11 Higher

Topics

Sampling and More Complex Diagrams

Combined Events

Properties of Circles

Variation

Triangles

Graphs

Algebraic Fractions and Functions

Vector Geometry

Revision

Final Examination

Year 11 Foundation

Topics

Curved shapes and Pyramids

Number and Sequences

Right-angled Triangles

Congruency and Similarity

Probability: Combined Events

Powers and Standard Form

Simultaneous Equations

Linear Inequalities

Non-linear Graphs

Revision

Final Examination

Recommended support resources for Years 9 to 11 are Collins Connect, My Maths and Maths Watch
KS4 Qualifications

AQA GCSE Mathematics Linear (8300)

Students who require extra

support may be offered

AQA Entry Level Course (5930)

In MFL we aspire to use the Target Language in every day college life, and to develop a knowledge of language to be used outside school: on holiday, in a future work situation for example. We are committed to learn all key and topic specific vocabulary as well as all grammar points and tenses. We are also committed be curious and to learn about the culture and customs of the people who live in French speaking countries. We are successful when we build on previous knowledge in order to achieve the higher grade we are capable of.

Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11
Vocabulary
  • Hobbies
  • Home
  • School and clothes
  • Daily routine
  • French speaking countries
  • Me & my family
  • Health
  • Media
  • Holiday
  • Customs
  • Free time
  • Home
  • School
  • Technology
  • Travel
  • Festivals
  • Technology
  • Global issues
  • Social issues
  • Post-16
  • Identity and Culture
  • Local, national and Global areas of interest
  • Study and Employment
Grammar
  • Masculine / feminine, singular / plural
  • Adjective, adverb, comparative, superlative
  • Conjugated verb + infinitive
  • Clauses
  • Masculine / feminine, singular / plural
  • Conjugated verb + infinitive
  • Adjective, adverb, comparative, superlative
  • Negative
  • Complex structures
  • Masculine / feminine, singular / plural
  • Adjective, adverb, comparative, superlative
  • Conjugated verb + infinitive
  • Negative
  • Clauses
  • Complex structures
  • Masculine / feminine, singular / plural
  • Adjective, adverb, comparative, superlative
  • Conjugated verb + infinitive
  • Negative
  • Clauses
  • Object pronouns
  • Complex structures
  • Masculine / feminine, singular / plural
  • Adjective, adverb, comparative, superlative
  • Conjugated verb + infinitive
  • Negative
  • Clauses
  • Object pronouns
  • Complex structures
Tenses
  • Present tense
  • Perfect tense
  • Near future tense
  • Present tense
  • Perfect tense
  • Future tense
  • Present tense
  • Perfect tense
  • Imperfect tense
  • Pluperfect tense
  • Near future tense
  • Future tense
  • Conditional
  • Present tense
  • Imperfect tense
  • Pluperfect tense
  • Subjunctive
  • Present tense
  • Perfect tense
  • Imperfect tense
  • Pluperfect tense
  • Near future tense
  • Future tense
  • Conditional
  • Subjunctive
Skills
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing

Crown Hills Community College IT & Computing Overview

The IT & Computing department presently has three dedicated rooms, each well equipped with PCs and an electronic white board for teaching purposes. A further room is to be built as part of the expansion of the college.

The college has a range of technology in each zone including Laptops, and iPads that can be hired out by each faculty.

Curriculum & Modes of Study Overview

Our vibrant and forward thinking Computing department teach the following modes of study to students in Key Stage 3:

Students in Years 7-8 have one discrete Computing lesson per week.

They are taught in mixed ability groups.

Schemes of work follow the National Curriculum and are constantly reviewed and updated to meet the ever changing needs of our students and governmental changes.

At key points in the curriculum students are assessed to reinforce their learning.

In Year 9 students are currently taught toward their KS4 GCSE, fine tuning skills taught through year7 and 8 with new emphasis on Computing Science, programming and computational thinking.

Key Stage 3 students will be able to:

  • Collaborate on projects
  • Use skills that combine multiple software applications across a range of devices
  • Collect and analyse data and information to meet the needs of a given target audience
  • Create, reuse and repurpose digital information and content
  • Understand and plan for copyright and intellectual property laws
  • Use two programming languages
  • Understand hardware and software components
  • Explain network topologies
  • Understand how to stay eSafe and advise others how to do the same
  • Understand maths for Computing – binary
  • Use control systems to model systems i.e. traffic lights

Key Stage 4 students

All our students will have the opportunity to take qualifications in aspects of GCSE Computing or Creative iMedia, which lead to progression for higher levels of study at college, or within a professional career.

ROUTES FOR PROGRESSION:

Students wishing to continue in this subject will be able to progress to A Level ICT. Students who do not wish to study ICT further will be able to use their ICT skills to assist other A Level subjects. Students wishing to go to College will be able to use their ICT skills to assist whichever course they pursue; Students going into Apprenticeships will clearly be able to show employers and trainers the level of their ICT competence using a recognised qualification, especially in the areas covered by the units outlined below.

Creative iMedia GCSE

Creative iMedia

If you like creating things on the computer, then Creative iMedia is the course you might choose.

It has 4 units, 3 of them are based on your coursework in making and changing images using Photoshop, making webpages and making games using Game Maker. One unit has a written exam to do, which is done in January of Year 10, but may be retaken if needed. All the 4 units are worth 25% of the overall grade each.

By taking this option you will be taking a Level 2 VCF course (not a BTEC) from OCR.

You will have the potential to gain GCSE grades 1 – 9 on successful completion of the course. A sample of typical units is listed below with explanation of the skillset assessed on the unit.

  • R081: Pre-production skills.  This is a compulsory unit, based on all aspects of planning projects from Mood boards to Gantt Charts. It will also develop their understanding of the client brief, time frames, deadlines and preparation techniques that form part of the planning and creation process. For the assessment of this unit, the students will be entered for an exam, which may be retaken if needed.
  • R082: Creating digital graphics.  This is also a compulsory unit, in which Photoshop is used to edit photographs and images to suit given situations. For the assessment of this unit, students will complete a 10 hour controlled assessment which is marked by the teaching staff and externally moderated.
  • R085: Creating a multiple website. In this unit, Students will have the opportunity to understand the basics of creating multiple websites through this unit. They will also be able to demonstrate their creativity by combining components to create a functional, intuitive and aesthetically pleasing website using Dreamweaver or Web Plus. For the assessment of this unit students will complete a 10 hour controlled assessment which is marked by the teaching staff and externally moderated.
  • R092: Developing digital games. Through this unit, students will examine the basics of creating digital games and their environments for the creative and digital media sector. They will also develop the know-how to create a playable game from an existing design or brief. For the assessment of this unit, students will complete a 10 hour controlled assessment which is marked by the teaching staff and externally moderated.

Click here for Information about OCR iMedia GCSE Qualification

Crown Hills Community College IT & Computing Overview

The IT & Computing department presently has three dedicated rooms, each well equipped with PCs and an electronic white board for teaching purposes. A further room is to be built as part of the expansion of the college.

The college has a range of technology in each zone including Laptops, and iPads that can be hired out by each faculty.

Curriculum & Modes of Study Overview

Our vibrant and forward thinking Computing department teach the following modes of study to students in Key Stage 3:

Students in Years 7-8 have one discrete Computing lesson per week.

They are taught in mixed ability groups.

Schemes of work follow the National Curriculum and are constantly reviewed and updated to meet the ever changing needs of our students and governmental changes.

At key points in the curriculum students are assessed to reinforce their learning.

In Year 9 students are currently taught toward their KS4 GCSE, fine tuning skills taught through year7 and 8 with new emphasis on Computing Science, programming and computational thinking.

Key Stage 3 students will be able to:

  • Collaborate on projects
  • Use skills that combine multiple software applications across a range of devices
  • Collect and analyse data and information to meet the needs of a given target audience
  • Create, reuse and repurpose digital information and content
  • Understand and plan for copyright and intellectual property laws
  • Use two programming languages
  • Understand hardware and software components
  • Explain network topologies
  • Understand how to stay eSafe and advise others how to do the same
  • Understand maths for Computing – binary
  • Use control systems to model systems i.e. traffic lights

Key Stage 4 students

All our students will have the opportunity to take qualifications in aspects of GCSE Computing or Creative iMedia, which lead to progression for higher levels of study at college, or within a professional career.

ROUTES FOR PROGRESSION:

Students wishing to continue in this subject will be able to progress to A Level ICT. Students who do not wish to study ICT further will be able to use their ICT skills to assist other A Level subjects. Students wishing to go to College will be able to use their ICT skills to assist whichever course they pursue; Students going into Apprenticeships will clearly be able to show employers and trainers the level of their ICT competence using a recognised qualification, especially in the areas covered by the units outlined below.

Computer Science

This carefully planned course gives students a real in-depth understanding of how computer technology works.

It offers an insight into what goes on ‘behind the scenes’, including computer programming.

For suitable KS4 Computing students they will learn to do the following:

  • Develop their understanding of current and emerging technologies and how they work.
  • Look at the use of algorithms in computer programs
  • Become independent and discerning users of IT
  • Acquire and apply creative and technical skills, knowledge and understanding of Computing in a range of contexts
  • Develop computer programs to solve problems
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of computer programs/solutions and impact of computer technology in society

Assessment:

You will have the potential to gain a GCSE Computing Science qualification graded 1-9; with exam and range of topics supplied by OCR.  This is an Ebaccalaureate subject option.  The course is assessed by a written paper, which has a mixture of short and long answer questions, some of which require students to write program code.  This course is 100% assessed by external examination.

Click here for Information about OCR GCSE Computing Qualification

Here at Crown Hills, we are committed to encouraging all our pupils to read widely for pleasure. Literacy skills underpin all aspects of academic learning and education and there is no refuting the evidence that a reading child is a successful child.

A number of initiatives are currently in place at Crown Hills to support, encourage and develop the reading skills of all of our pupils. We ensure that every child in the school has fifteen minutes of dedicated literacy development time for four mornings each week, adding up to an hour each week.

All our pupils are tested to establish their reading levels, and a number of interventions are in place to develop pupils’ confidence and skills. One of these initiatives is the VIP (the Vocabulary Improvement Programme), a 12 lesson unit of work designed to develop the vocabulary, reading and writing skills of pupils falling about 2 years below their actual age in terms of reading comprehension. 52 pupils in years 7 and 8 have completed the programme so far, and of these, 40 have shown a significant improvement in their reading, with an average increase of 2 years in the space of a few weeks. This is a 77% success rate and we plan to continue and expand the programme in the future.

All pupils are issued with their reading ages and our library is extremely well stocked with books tailored to all reading abilities; pupils are able to find books appropriately challenging but accessible for their age and ability. To support this, our Librarian has painstakingly taken the time to ensure all books are labelled with reading age needed for the content. Many of our more able readers become Leaders of Literacy and support their peers with reading and other literacy development strategies. Likewise, all teaching staff have access to the reading ages of pupils in their classes and tailor their lessons and reading materials to match the needs of the children.

A recent reading survey, conducted by a third party, has provided some very encouraging results in regard to our pupils’ attitude towards reading for pleasure. These include:

o The percentage of pupils liking the books Crown Hills has to offer continues to rise.

o At Crown Hills a higher percentage of boys than girls want to become a better reader.

o 76% of pupils felt that regular readers are people “who want to do well”.

o 85% of pupils who completed the survey said they enjoy reading.

o 85% of our pupils who completed the reading survey, read at home for pleasure at least once per week.

o 24% of pupils read for pleasure at home every day.

A number of students at Crown Hills College have difficulties with reading. Some students have learning difficulties and others are new to English. We strive to identify students, through one to one assessments, for additional support to develop their reading. Once identified, we use appropriate interventions. We deliver Read Write Inc. Fresh Start to students with limited reading skills. This is a phonic based intervention which aims to secure phonic knowledge and decoding. For students at the next level, we deliver Rapid Plus during morning literacy time. This aims to boost reading comprehension, and students have made great leaps in their reading through this.

There are a number of students at Crown Hills who are new to English and are supported by the EAL department. The EAL staff support reading through reading groups during literacy time. These groups focus on building vocabulary and high frequency words. They use the Oxford Reading Tree for the new arrivals. For the students who have been in the country for a longer period of time, the EAL staff also use Rapid Plus. Last year, some EAL students from Year 11 were used as group leaders to support Year 8 EAL students with their reading. This was successful and so the same is planned for this academic year. During morning literacy time, we also deliver Lexia, an online literacy intervention, to larger groups of students. The results from our trial of Lexia were fantastic in giving a boost to reading and spelling skills. For some students, reading comprehension and ‘reading between the lines’ are more of a challenge. For these students we can deliver Inference Training in small groups.

YEAR 7 CATCH-UP GRANT FOR 2014/2015
Details Income Expenditure
Year 7 Catch Up Grant 2014/15  33,500.00
Resources 84.45
Tutor 7,900.00
Tutor 7,806.11
Total 33,500.00 15,709.56
Balance 17,709.44

Balance of £17,709.44 will cover Tutors Salary for this academic year (2015/16) as we have not been notified if funding is to continue.

English At Crown Hills Community College
Year 7 & 8

English Language & Literature

Students will engage with poetry, plays, novels and a variety of non-fiction texts.

Students will write creatively and respond critically to texts.

Speaking & Listening activities will take place throughout the years.

Students will undertake two author studies a year.

Students will complete reading and writing assessments which mirror the questions they will be asked in their AQA examinations in Y11.

Students will sit two exam papers which mirror exactly what they will face in their exams in Y11.

Students will learn through a variety of teaching methods such as: paired work, group work, drama based responses, independent enquiry, becoming an expert and teaching others, using technology as a learning aid and using thinking methods.

Year 9

English Literature GCSE (Year 1)

Students will begin their GCSE English Literature course in preparation for their examination at the end of Y10 if they are ready, Year 11 if they are not.

Students will write creatively and respond critically to texts.

Speaking & Listening activities will take place throughout the year.

Students will study texts which will prepare them for their exam texts.

Students will complete reading and writing assessments which mirror the questions they will be asked in their AQA examinations in Y10/11.

Students will sit two exam papers which mirror exactly what they will face in their exams in Y10/Y11.

Students will learn through a variety of teaching methods such as: paired work, group work, drama based responses, independent enquiry, becoming an expert and teaching others, using technology as a learning aid and using thinking methods.

Year 10 & 11

English Language and English Literature GCSE

Students study the AQA exam board.

They will study for two separate GCSEs.

Each exam is 100% final exam; there is no longer any coursework or controlled assessments.

There is now only one tier of entry. Every student attempts the same exam paper.

Grades will be given from 1-9.

Students will learn through a variety of teaching methods such as: paired work, group work, drama based responses, independent enquiry, becoming an expert and teaching others, using technology as a learning aid and using thinking methods.

English Language

Students must complete one Spoken Language assessment that is recorded but does not contribute to the overall grade.

Paper One is fiction based and lasts 1 hour and 45 minutes.

Students will answer 4 questions in response to a fiction extract.

Students will complete one written response – either a piece of description or a narrative.

Paper Two is non-fiction based and lasts 1 hour and 45 minutes.

Students will answer 4 questions in response to two non-fiction extracts.

Students will complete one written response – either a letter, article, leaflet, essay or speech.

English Literature

Paper One asks students to respond to a Shakespeare play and a pre-20th century novel and lasts for 1 hour and 45 minutes.

Paper Two asks students to respond to a modern text, two studied poems and two unseen poems and lasts for 2 hours and 15 minutes.

Texts that may be studied include:

‘Macbeth’

‘Romeo & Juliet’

‘Much Ado About Nothing’

‘A Christmas Carol’

‘An Inspector Calls’

‘Animal Farm’

‘The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time’

A Poetry Anthology.

Key Stage 3

Students complete a 2 year Key Stage 3 course, studying topics across Biology, Chemistry and Physics

There are 10 major areas of study, each area contains 4 topics, making 40 topics in total.

These are studied across Years 7 and 8. The areas of study are:

1. Forces

2. Electricity and magnetism

3. Energy

4. Waves

5. Matter

6. Chemical Reactions

7. Earth and Space

8. The Human Reproductive System

9. Organisms

10. Ecosystems

11. Genes

Key Stage 4

Students study for their GCSE across Years 9, 10 and 11.

The Science GCSE is a double award and students receive 2 grades.

Students will take 6 exams at the end of the course; there is no controlled assessment.

Students study topics across Biology, Chemistry and Physics

Biology Chemistry Physics
1. Cell Biology 8. Atomic structure and the periodic table 18. Energy
2. Organisation 9. Bonding, structure, and the properties of matter 19. Electricity
3. Infection and response 10. Quantitative chemistry 20. Particle model of matter
4. Bioenergetics 11. Chemical changes 21. Atomic structure
5. Homeostasis and response 12. Energy changes 22. Forces
6. Inheritance, variation and evolution 13. The rate and extent of chemical change 23. Waves
7. Ecology 14. Organic chemistry 24. Magnetism and electromagnetism
15. Chemical analysis
16. Chemistry of the atmosphere
17. Using resources

At crown Hills we offer one of the most varied and all encompassing DT curriculums of any inner city school.

7 different materials based learning areas delivering project based learning rich in practical skill based experiences:

Woods and Timbers

Metal and Polymers

Product Design (electronics)

Fashion and Textiles

Food Preparation Nutrition

Graphics (Computer Aided Design)

STEM: Exploring applications for our scientific understanding of forces and human digestion.

While many schools are reducing the number of lessons or the range of experiences offered in this subject area, Crown Hills takes pride in its ongoing commitment to developing its allocation for this valuable subject.

Curriculum At KS3

Students begin Y7 in Design Technology with a 4 week key skills program to develop the core design techniques needed for success in each material area (the program is currently being updated to integrate with all aspects of the new 2017 specification).

Over the next 2 years they then rotate through the 7 material areas completing an extended design and manufacture project in each area (10 weeks in length).

Independent Enquiry Learning at KS3

STEM (science, Technology, Engineering and maths) is a hot topic at the moment both in industry and in schools.

The Crown Hills Discovery Zone is where maths, science and DT work together to prepare students for further STEM studies and to encourage them to aspire to careers in this exciting and rapidly developing industry.

Our vision for Design Technology is that it should provide the contextual application of maths and science linked with problem solving, creativity and practical skills that are at the core of the DT curriculum.

KS3 Students now take part in two STEM projects as part of their DT lessons.

These projects are delivered with a focus on personal investigation, discovery and involve independent learning journeys that are directed by the students

Curriculum At KS4

At the end of Y8 students make their options choices and can select one “specialist” area of Design Technology to continue with to GCSE level

The last 6 weeks of Y8 is used for transition work to prepare students for the more demanding expectations for success at KS4

KS4 GCSE courses

AQA 1-9 Design Technology

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/design-and-technology/gcse/design-and-technology-8552

This is the new generic qualification for all students wishing to study resistant materials, graphics or textiles at GCSE. Single specialism qualifications are no longer offered by any exam board.

Current teachers:

Mr. J. Hallett (HoF)- Graphics

Mr. P. Newbold, Mr. S. Marston and Miss Rebelo- Resistant Materials

Miss Sagoo and Mrs Marshall- Textiles

In Year 9

Students refine and develop existing skills and build new knowledge and understanding through theory based taught lessons (assessed through class work, homework and test results) as well as creating practical test pieces. Periodically they will also undertake a number of small mini projects so they have a chance to apply everything they have learnt independently.

In Year 10

Student’s theoretical knowledge is developed so they can apply it successfully in different situations. Through personal reflection practical skills are also refined and improved. Students are exposed to user evaluation techniques and how to accurately test their final outcomes. The year concludes with a “mock” NEA (Non Externally Assessed) coursework projects. On the first of June the 3 starting points or themes for the actual NEA coursework will be released by the exam board.

Over the summer holiday former Y10 students should be completing a significant body of research work for their NEA

In Year 11

Students focus the first 15 weeks on completing their 40-hour NEA coursework project (50% of the total final grade). The remainder of the year is spent preparing for the final exam in July)

AQA 1-9 Food Preparation and Nutrition

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/food

Current teachers:

Miss K. Clayton

Miss B. Parra

In Year 9

In Year 10

 In Year 11

Supporting Student Aspiration and Success

New for 2018 Our careers and “wider emersion” project. Linking what are pupils learn in the classroom to a future career. We offer enrichment activities involving professional speakers, industrial visits, high quality work experience placement scholarships, entering work into national competitions and recently, working with 3rd party organisations including Universities to run projects that are delivered by university students and their lecturers.

Lunchtime drop ins for KS 3 and 4. To support those who are struggling and to challenge those who are more able Design Technology classrooms and workshops are open at lunch and after school. During this time a wide variety of activities take place. Targeted intervention on tricky practical skills, exploring the bigger picture around key topics to broaden the knowledge of our most able or maybe just making lolly pop stick catapults in engineering club! – There is always something interesting going on at lunch time- come and get involved.

Learning Apps

https://www.gethopscotch.com

Hopskotch

Hopskotch is an iPad app that allows kids to program their own games and animations, letting their creativity run wild while learning the basics of programming. Inspired by MIT’s Scratch, the app is ranked #6 in the AppStore’s Education section and is recommended for students aged eight and up.

https://www.sketchup.com/products/sketchup-free

SketchUp

SketchUp Free is the simplest, easiest-to-use 3D free modeler around. You don’t need thousands of buttons and dropdowns for 3D drawing: you do need space to draw. It loads in modern web browsers on any operating system. Also sketchUp Free is versionless: you’re always using the fastest, most up-to-date iteration.

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/autodesk-sketchbook/id883738213?mt=8

Autodesk Sketchbook

Autodesk are the industry leaders for computer aided design software. This is their flagship professional drawing package for tablet and phone, which is now available for free!

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/adobe-photoshop-sketch/id839085644?mt=8

Adobe Photoshop Sketch

Adobe Photoshop Sketch presents artists with familiar Photoshop drawing tools, including a graphite pencil, ink pen, blending markers and an eraser, as well as brushes including acrylic and pastel.

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/adobe-illustrator-draw/id911156590?mt=8

Adobe Illustrator Draw

You can create vector art with Illustrator Draw, with lots of handy tools at your fingertips to make the experience easier and more efficient. You’ll be able to create perfect lines and curves thanks to the Touch Slide digital ruler, and add images from multiple sources

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/adobe-capture-cc/id1040200189?mt=8

Adobe Capture CC

Adobe Capture CC turns your iPhone and iPad into a creation machine. Imagine looking through your camera to see patterns, vectors, and even fonts. Now imagine turning those into brushes, textures and shapes you can use in Photoshop!

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/everycircuit/id797157761?mt=8

Every Circuit

Build any circuit, tap play button, and watch dynamic voltage, current, and charge animations. This gives you insight into circuit operation like no equation does. While simulation is running, adjust circuit parameters with analog knob, and the circuit responds

https://itunes.apple.com/kw/app/design-and-technology-resistant-materials/id383019810?mt=8

Design Technology: Resistant Materials

The successful DT App has now been split into individual subjects so you can learn and revise the subject of your choice at a fantastic price. The application includes information and revision quizzes for Resistant Materials as well as general guidance for coursework and controlled assessment tasks (cost £0.99)

https://itunes.apple.com/kw/app/design-and-technology-food-technology/id510434584?mt=8

Design Technology: Food Technology

The successful D&T App has continued to grow and include Food Technology. Now available as an individual application you can learn and revise key topics for your GCSE exam and course work assessments (cost £0.99)

The Expressive Arts Faculty is divided into four different departments: Art, Dance, Drama & Music

At Key Stage 3 each student studies the four Expressive Arts subjects in rotation each year.

At Key Stage 4 students choose Expressive Arts subjects from a list of options that includes subjects from other faculties.

Each Expressive Arts Department offers extra-curricular activities and lessons at lunchtime and after school.

Each department also offers opportunities for students to perform or display their work and go on trips as part of the curriculum.

Art

Key Stage 3 – Students study the National Curriculum for Art learning to develop their creativity and ideas, and improve their artistic skills.

They also learn to understand the work of artists and designers throughout history and up to the present day. They learn to use a range of techniques and materials and understand how to evaluate their work.

Key Stage 4

Year 10 AQA GCSE Art & Design Syllabus 8201.

Year 11 AQA GCSE Art & Design Syllabus 4201.

Extra-curricular Art – Art Clubs are available at lunchtime and after school for Key Stage 3 & 4.

Dance

Key Stage 3 – Dance – Students create and devise their own choreographed work using skills and techniques taught in class alongside the promotion of physical education, health and body awareness.

Key Stage 4 – Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 in Performing Arts

Extra-curricular Dance includes Indian Garba and Bhangra.

Drama

Key Stage 3 – Students learn to improvise, rehearse and perform their own drama using role, intonation, tone, volume, mood, silence, stillness and action to add impact.

Students discover through the use of the drama medium elements of drama and explorative strategies.

Develop confidence, communication skills, creativity and self-esteem.

Key Stage 4

Year 11 Drama Edexcel GCSE Syllabus 2DR01.

Year 10 Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 in Performing Arts – Acting.

Music

Key Stage 3

Year 7 – Students learn the basics of Music Notation by learning simple tunes on the electronic keyboard and the use of music technology.They find out about the elements of Music.

Students learn ensemble and solo performance skills, about African rhythms and melodies and how to improvise.

Year 8 – Students learn about Indian Music Notation and how to compose their own Indian Music using a Raga.

They also learn a Bollywood melody and remix it to create their own version.

Year 9 – Students learn about Blues Music, and explore how Pop music developed from Blues through other styles and genres to what it is today.

They learn how this music is composed and put together using rhythms, chords, riffs and bass lines.

They also learn about how music is used by the media

Key Stage 4

Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Music

The Music Department offers an extensive extra-curricular timetable of instrumental lessons and ensemble groups.

Parents/Carers may find the following links helpful:

Leicester-Shire Music Education Hub

My Panyard

D-E-A Classes and Tuition

Please find below links to music from our Steel Bands

Merry Christmas

Footsteps

The Lion Sleeps Tonight

Soul Limbo

Just the way you are

Little Mermaid

Stand By Me

Yellow Submarine

All pupils at Crown Hills Community College have two lessons a week on Citizenship and PSHEE (Personal Health and Economic Education) in KS3.

Citizenship education is about enabling pupils to make their own decisions and to take responsibility for their own lives as well as taking in interest and participating in local, national and international issues.

We encourage students to understand their rights and responsibilities and become ‘model’, ‘good’ and ‘active’ citizens both in school and in their futures.

We encourage pupils to relate to real life events, controversial and topical issues that encourage and develop thinking, research and debating skills as well as numeracy and literacy skills.

Our PSHEE lessons develop self-confidence and strategies to deal with lifes challenges and explore opportunities of adult and working life.

Citizenship and PSHEE is about developing :

•Knowledge and understanding:

•Skills and aptitudes: Critical thinking, analysing information, expressing opinions, taking part in discussions, debates, negotiating, conflict resolution and participating in community action.

•Values and dispositions: Respect for justice, democracy and the rule of law, openness, tolerance, courage to defend a point of view and a willingness to listen to, work with and stand up for others.

Citizenship and PSHEE is important because it addresses real issues, relating to social justice, human rights, community cohesion and developing students SMSC awareness (Social, Moral, Spiritual and Cultural) both now and in the future.

The Life Skills KS3 Curriculum at a glance

Year 7 Year 8 Year 9
Citizenship 1 = Rules, fairness, rights & responsibilities, the work of the school council, having your say and democracy. Citizenship 1 = Rules, fairness, rights & responsibilities, the Law, ASBO’s, young offenders, gangs, mock trial, sentencing and the youth offending team. Citizenship 1 = Rules, fairness, responsibilities, justice, Human Rights, police rights, surveillance, terrorism, freedom of information and equality.
Citizenship 2 = Communities and identities, being good and active citizens, changing our community and bringing communities together. Citizenship 2 = Local communities and local government involves understanding local issues, the work of the council, stereotyping, racism, sexism, discrimination and the law. Citizenship 2 = National Government and National Politics, political parties, various voting systems, role of MP’s, Houses of Parliament, law making, pressure groups, UK Government and the monarchy.
Citizenship 3 = Being a global citizen, understanding child labour, Fair trade, charity and volunteering. Citizenship 3 = Human rights in a global community, refugees, migration, media and the free press. Citizenship 3 = Britain and the world: Europe, the Commonwealth, United Nations, Northern Ireland and South Africa.
PSHEE 1 = Understanding yourself and relationships. (Including anti-bullying week). Dealing with homework, family issues, domestic violence etc. PSHEE 1 = Understanding yourself and relationships looks at self-esteem, shyness, leisure time, beating boredom, divided families, domestic violence, friendship, culture, lifestyle and influences. We also investigate stereotypes. PSHEE 1 = Understanding yourself and relationships looks at becoming an adult, dealing with loss and bereavement, assertive behaviour, mental illness and racism.
PSHEE 2 = You and your money, looks at money management and being a consumer. PSHEE 2 = You and your money investigates financial risks and gambling awareness. PSHEE 2 = You and your money looks at banking, savings and being a green consumer.
PSHEE 3 = You and work, looks at skills, qualities, qualifications, doing market research, designing, marketing and presenting a product as a group. PSHEE 3 = You and work looks at the organisation of firms, employment and unemployment, different industries, finance, risk and profit. PSHEE 3 = You and work looks at decision making, knowing our strengths, skills and qualities.(including the Options module) and undertaking careers research.
PSHEE 4 = You and your body: looks at puberty and the awareness of drugs and smoking. PSHEE 4 = Keeping healthy looks at the risk and awareness of alcohol and drugs, physical safety at home and in the streets PSHEE 4 =You and your body looks at adolescence, eating disorders, drugs awareness, positive body image, physical safety, relationships and STI’s

In KS4, (year 10 and 11) pupils undertake a GCSE in Humanities (AQA Board), this integrates religious studies, history, geography and Life Skills.

Students look at four key areas, they are examined on this and the exam is worth 75% of their final grade.

In addition, pupils work independently to complete a 2,000 word essay in controlled conditions with support from their Life Skills teacher.

This is worth 25% of the final grade.

Pupils are provided with a source booklet prior to the exam to work from, annotate and prepare for prior to the exam.

Culture and Core Beliefs

• Understanding common and contrasting cultures

• Understanding simple and complex cultures

• Understanding subculture, agents of socialisation, identity and IQ

• Understanding the nature V nurture debate

• Understanding laws, morals values, beliefs and rituals

• Understanding migration and multiculturalism

• Investigating social, moral, political or religious issues (capital punishment, euthanasia, medical ethics, the monarchy etc)

Conflict and Cooperation

• Understanding causes and effects of conflict.

• Understanding Human Rights, freedoms and responsibilities.

• Conflict at a local level (bullying)

• Conflict at a national level (apartheid and South Africa)

• Conflict at an international level (Rwanda)

• Students have the opportunity to select other conflicts i.e. Syria, Palestine, Afghanistan, Iraq as case studies etc.

Environment

• Environmental problems (pollution, global warming, habitats, climate change, exploitation, tourism etc.)

• Understanding renewable and non-renewable resources

• Looking at the energy crises

• Individual and group responses to the environment, the work of political groups, pressure groups and business

• Solutions to environmental problems

• Investigating case studies: Tropical rainforests, deforestation, coral reefs etc.

• Investigating sustainable solutions

• Investigating National Parks

People and work

• Understanding the relevance of work in different cultures

• Motivations for work

• Understanding leisure and work satisfaction

• Understanding the impact of unemployment

• Understanding the impact of technology

• Understanding the three main employment sectors

• Explaining globalisation and multinational companies and the change in working patterns

• Looking at economic migration

• Investigating case studies involving conflict in the workplace, equality legislation and the role of trade unions

In 2016, the faculty has also started delivering Citizenship GCSE at KS4

This is 100% exam based and includes the following topics

RIGHTS, THE LAW AND THE LEGAL SYSTEM IN ENGLAND AND WALES DEMOCRACY AND GOVERNMENT THE UK AND THE WIDER WORLD
Rights and responsibilities Democracy, elections and voting in the UK Identities and diveristy in the UK society
The law National, local, regional and devolved government The UK and its relations with the wider world.
The legal system The British Constitution
The economy, finance and money
The role of the media and free press
Citizenship participation and action
Politics beyond the UK

Please encourage your child to use sophisticated vocubulary, watch/read the news and develop an opinion on what is going on locally, nationall and internationally.

Try to discuss current affairs with them and encourage them to attend the numerous revision sessions that the school offers during lunchtimes and after school.

Revision booklets are provided closer to the exams.

In addition we teach a one off Life Skills lesson which prepares students for the wider world.

Students look at:

Financial Management Work SRE British Values
Consumer/Banking/ Debt/ Financial Management Economic Enterprise/understanding payslips/insurance CV’s, letters of application, UCAS, personal statements, charity work and volunteering Teenage Parent Contraception lesson SR awareness Forced marriage Mental Health Eating disorders Homophobia Legal Highs/Shisha Smoking SEN/Drug Awareness Diabetic awareness Cancer awareness Radicalisation Gang Culture Knife Crime Anti-Social Behavior
HISTORY CURRICULUM

Year 7

Autumn – Spring Term

Crown Vs the people – A study looking at the actions of different monarchs and key characters in history between 1066 and 1400 and considering how these have shaped Britain including people such as William the Conqueror, Simon de Montfort, Henry II, Thomas Becket. We also look at what life was like in this time considering issues such as the Black Death.

Spring – Summer Term

Turbulent Tudors- An in depth look at the different Tudor monarchs and how they helped to shape Britain. We consider the changes to religion they brought as well as moving on to look at the Stuarts.

Year 8

Autumn term

Empire to equality – An outline study considering the Slave trade and its abolition, as well as life for Black Americans in 20th Century America.

Spring term

The Industrial Revolution – A depth study considering the changes in Britain between 1750 and 1850 including the rise of factories and the working conditions for child labourers.

Summer term

Conflict in the twentieth century- A thematic study looking at how conflict has evolved and developed over the last 100 years considering events such as WW1, WW2, the dropping of the atomic bomb, the Vietnam was as well as modern day terrorism.

Year 9

Autumn – Spring Term

America 1910-1929- Starting the GCSE syllabus this module looks at developments in America such as the intolerance faced by immigrants, political factions and black Americans. We also look at the economic issues surrounding the economic boom of the 1920s leading to eventual Wall Street Crash in 1929. We finish the topic looking at the social side of the 1920s looking at what people did for fun and attitudes to women and how these developed over the period.

Spring – Summer Term

The development of Germany 1919-1991- our second GCSE module looks at the development of Germany from 1919 with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles through Hitler’s reign all the way through the cold war culminating in the tearing down of the Berlin wall in 1989 and the aftermath and impact on Germany.

Year 10- Eduqas specification

Autumn Term

The Elizabethan Age, 1558-1603- We look at how Elizabeth gained control over the country, the issues she had with religion and foreign powers alongside how her reign impacted upon normal people in society.

Spring Term

Changes in Health and Medicine in Britain, c.500 to the present day- We look thematically at key figures and influences in the changing of medicine.

Year 11

Recap of the year 9 and 10 modules with focussed revision.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES CURRICULUM

Year 7

Autumn Term

Introduction to Religious studies, Philosophy and Ethics – A study of the identity of God across religions

Creation Theory and Identity of God – A study of views of creation with a philosophical look to scientific and religious creation theory.

Spring Term

Founders and Pilgrimage – A study of founders, key figures and pilgrimage within religion

Festivals

Summer Term – No RS as Humanities rotations

Year 8

Autumn – Spring Term

Holy books and Moral codes – A study into holy books and moral codes with an investigation into medical ethics

Spring – Summer Term

Founders and Pilgrimage – A study of founders, key figures and pilgrimage within religion

Year 9 Autumn – Spring Term

Founders and Pilgrimage – A study of founders, key figures and pilgrimage within religion

Spring – Summer Term

Worship Beliefs and Practices – A study of beliefs and practices of religious groups

Year 10 – WJEC Eduqas GCSE in Religious Studies

Autumn Term

COMPONENT 2 – Christian Beliefs and Teachings

COMPNENT 3 – Hindu Beliefs & Teaching

Spring Term

COMPONENT 1 – Issues of Relationships

COMPONENT 1 – Issues of life and death

Summer Term

COMPONENT 2 – Christianity Practices

Year 11 – OCR B Religion Philosophy and Applied Ethics

Autumn Term

Philosophy 2 – Good and evil

Ethics 2 – Religion, Peace and justice

Spring Term

Philosophy 2 – Religion and Science

Ethics 2 – Religion and the Media

Summer Term

Revision

GEOGRAPHY CURRICULUM

Year 7

Pupils are taught on a rotation so will either study Geography or History for the first half term and then swap in the second half term.

Autumn – Spring Term

An Introduction to Geography incorporating geographical skills e.g. map work

Spring – Summer Term

Weather and climate

Ecosystems

Year 8

Autumn – Spring Term

Coasts

Population

Spring – Summer Term>

Natural hazards

Rivers and flooding

Year 9

OCR A Specification- Geographical Themes.

The course is comprised of 3 units

2 content exams: Living in the UK today (1hr) and The world around us (1hr)

1 fieldwork skills exam

Autumn Term

Paper 1 – Living in the UK today

Landscapes of the UK

People of the UK

Spring Term

Paper 1 – Living in the UK today

Environmental challenges in the UK

Summer Term

Paper 2 – The world around us

Ecosystems

Year 10

Autumn Term

Paper 2 – The world around us

People of the Planet

Environmental Threats

Spring Term

Geographical Skills and fieldwork

Summer Term

Focused and personalised revision to prepare for Mock examinations

Year 11

Recapping of year 9 and 10 topics, practising exam skills and personalised revision

KS 3 and KS 4 PE

The best way of supporting your child will be to encourage them to increase fitness levels and be able to swim at least 25meters.

Encourage them by working with them on fitness activities at home whether this is spending 30mins jogging, cycling, swimming etc.

Activities that will make them out of breath.

Aim to do this 3-5 times a week

Below is a link for Spence street leisure centre showing pool times and possible swimming classes to help your child achieve the 25m goal.

Spence Street Leisure Centre

Potential fitness circuits you could do at home could be searched from the following web link

Home Exercise and Fitness

If your child shows an interest in a sport then take them to a local club to try it out. Use the following link to search the sport of interest.

BBC Get Inspired

Throughout their time in school pupils will be looking to develop Fitness and will be involved in a variety of sports.

These will be done on rotational method.

Sports they might experience Football, Netball, Badminton, Basketball, Cricket, Rounders, Gymnastics, Athletics, Volleyball, Fitness, Table Tennis

Encourage your child to participate in extracurricular activities either inside or outside of school.

KS4 Sport

If your child chooses Sport as an option then they will follow 1 of 2 strands.

OCR National Sport Studies or AQA GCSE Physical Education. The PE faculty will make the decision which is most appropriate for your child.

The following links will give more information on both qualifications

AQA GCSE Physical education

https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/pe/specifications/AQA-8582-SP-2016.PDF

It is vital that students studying this course are involved in competitive sport outside of college and regularly attend extracurricular sporting activities.

OCR National Sports Studies

https://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/82412-specification.pdf

Pupils will complete 4 units.

2 core units. Unit 1 Contemporary issues in sport (Will be an 1 hour exam).

Unit 2 Developing sports skills.

2 optional units. Unit 3 Sports Leadership.

Unit 4 Sport and the media

In Leicester City there are 288 children who have a hearing impairment.

Some hearing losses are greater than others; therefore individual students will require different levels of support.

The majority of students attend their local main stream schools and are support by a Peripatetic Teacher of the Deaf within that setting.

However, there are students who, for a variety of reasons, need more intensive support.

These students are placed here at Crown Hills Community College where there is a unit designed to support Deaf students both academically and socially.

Every day they have access to Teachers of the Deaf and support staff that are specifically trained to teach and support them.

The teacher of the Deaf deliver language based subjects in the unit.

These include English, Humanities and Life Skills.

The rest of the curriculum is delivered in the mainstream setting with support from the specialist staff.

Tutorials are also a big part of the unit support.

During these sessions the students are given time to consolidate subject specific language on a one to one basis.

The unit setting also allows the students to develop their language and communication skills, both of which will be significantly delayed.

Over the years, the number of students who have attended the unit has fluctuated between twelve and one.

At the present time we have four students in the unit: two year 11 and two year 9.

There are a further four students who are taught in the mainstream of the school with support from a Teacher of the Deaf (on a regular basis but not in the unit)

The new facilities in the unit are superb.

The sound proof rooms mean that the students are getting the best possible access to the curriculum.

Hearing tests and equipment checks can be carried out with confidence, knowing that the outcome will be accurate.

Students
Parents